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Definitions of rout

  1. make a groove in, or provide with a groove, as of a record, for example
  2. a disorderly crowd of people
  3. dig with the snout; " the pig was rooting for truffles"
  4. an overwhelming defeat
  5. defeat disastrously
  6. cause to flee; " rout out the fighters from their caves"
  7. To roar; to bellow; to snort; to snore loudly.
  8. A bellowing; a shouting; noise; clamor; uproar; disturbance; tumult.
  9. To scoop out with a gouge or other tool; to furrow.
  10. To search or root in the ground, as a swine.
  11. A troop; a throng; a company; an assembly; especially, a traveling company or throng.
  12. A disorderly and tumultuous crowd; a mob; hence, the rabble; the herd of common people.
  13. A disturbance of the peace by persons assembled together with intent to do a thing which, if executed, would make them rioters, and actually making a motion toward the executing thereof.
  14. A fashionable assembly, or large evening party.
  15. To break the ranks of, as troops, and put them to flight in disorder; to put to rout.
  16. To assemble in a crowd, whether orderly or disorderly; to collect in company.
  17. The state of being disorganized and thrown into confusion; - said especially of an army defeated, broken in pieces, and put to flight in disorder or panic; also, the act of defeating and breaking up an army; as, the rout of the enemy was complete.
  18. Total defeat and flight, as of an army; disorder resulting from such defea a noisy crowd; a rabble; mob; formerly, a large evening party.
  19. To defeat and put to disor derly flight; to root up, as with the snout; to scoop out; to bring to view; turn up; to turn out by force.
  20. To root about; rummage.
  21. A tumultuous crowd, a rabble: a large party: a fashionable evening assembly.
  22. The defeat of an army or body of troops: the disorder of troops defeated.
  23. To put to disorderly flight: to defeat and throw into confusion: to conquer.
  24. A disorderly crowd; defeat; disorder of defeat; fashionable assembly.
  25. To put to disorderly flight.
  26. To defeat disastrously; put ot flight.
  27. To drive or drag forth, as from hiding.
  28. A disorderly and overwhelming defeat of flight.
  29. A disorderly assemblage; rabble.
  30. A clamorous multitude; a tumultuous crowd; uproar; a large evening party; the assembly and attempt of three or more people to avenge some common wrong; the defeat and flight of an army, or the resulting disorder or confusion.
  31. To defeat and put to disorderly flight.
  32. A tumultuous clamorous crowd; a rabble; a fashionable assembly or large evening- party.
  33. The defeat of an army or body of troops; the confusion and disorder attending a defeat.
  34. To break the ranks of a body of troops, and put them to a disorderly flight; to put to confusion by a repulse or a defeat.
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Usage examples for rout

  1. But their first defeat had been fatal and it had required only a small number of trained soldiers to rout them. – The Complete Historical Romances of Georg Ebers by Georg Ebers
  2. In a 3- day battle below Metz the French were terribly cut up and forced to retreat in almost a rout – America's War for Humanity by Thomas Herbert Russell
  3. He glanced coolly across at Sir Henry, then very pleasantly spoke of the coming rout at the Fort, expressing pleasure in gaiety and dancing. – The Reckoning by Robert W. Chambers
  4. Tell you what, we'll rout out the whole lot, and take them down in the stable- yard and burn them. – Burr Junior by G. Manville Fenn
  5. Do rout out, and do leave off thinking you've got a candle at your eyes, for Goodness' sake! – The Complete Project Gutenberg Works of George Meredith by George Meredith
  6. And Matty told him, and begged him to come and sleep in her own little room, because the children would come in in a rout at daybreak. – The-Brick-Moon-and-Other-Stories by Hale, Edward Everett
  7. Some made for Delium and the sea, some for Oropus, others for Mount Parnes, or wherever they had hopes of safety, pursued and cut down by the Boeotians, and in particular by the cavalry, composed partly of Boeotians and partly of Locrians, who had come up just as the rout began. – The History of the Peloponnesian War by Thucydides
  8. And yonder tents, deserted by the foe, Shall give us shelter when the rout is done. – Pharsalia; Dramatic Episodes of the Civil Wars by Lucan
  9. At that sight the Moors round broke forth in a wild and despairing cry: that cry spread from rank to rank, from horse to foot; the Moorish infantry, sorely pressed on all sides, no sooner learned the disaster than they turned to fly: the rout was as fatal as it was sudden. – Leila or, The Siege of Granada, Book V. by Edward Bulwer Lytton
  10. The retreat soon became a rout – The History of England from the Accession of James II. Volume 1 (of 5) by Thomas Babington Macaulay
  11. Lee struggled for a few minutes against this advance, and then ordered a retreat, which ended in a rout – Three Years in the Federal Cavalry by Willard Glazier
  12. Kilpatrick was defeated; his column in hopeless rout – Mohun, or, The Last Days of Lee by John Esten Cooke
  13. A weary half moon was bucketting through a rout of ragged clouds, which sped on over the mountains as if in haste to hide themselves from some unseen pursuer. – White Fire by John Oxenham
  14. Rinaldo went every where to hasten the rout and still had to fight and slay on. – Stories from the Italian Poets: With Lives of the Writers, Vol. 2 by Leigh Hunt
  15. Bothwell merely regarded the hostile lords as his rivals, who envied him the great position to which he had raised himself, and thought to rout them all with the feudal array which gathered round him at the Queen's summons. – A History of England Principally in the Seventeenth Century, Volume I (of 6) by Leopold von Ranke
  16. Whether the two Generals of the Convention misunderstood each other, or whether the soldiers at Bournan were unwilling to rout the royalists, it is impossible to say; but they remained at Bournan till the night, and then leaving their post during the darkness, made good their retreat to Angers. – La Vendée An Historical Romance by Anthony Trollope
  17. They began to retreat, yet not hurriedly and in rout but facing us and fighting their way. – The White Shield by Bertram Mitford
  18. Then fugitives arrived with the tale of the rout and the Punic army halted. – Salammbo by Gustave Flaubert
  19. They positively deserve that one should turn a mad cow in amongst them to rout their rabble- ranks. – Shirley by Charlotte Brontë
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