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Definitions of spore

  1. small usually single- celled reproductive body produced especially by certain bacteria and algae and fungi and nonflowering plants
  2. a small usually single- celled reproductive body produced by many plants and some protozoans and that develops into a new individual; " a sexual spore is formed after the fusion of gametes"
  3. One of the minute grains in flowerless plants, which are analogous to seeds, as serving to reproduce the species.
  4. An embryo sac or embryonal vesicle in the ovules of flowering plants.
  5. A minute grain or germ; a small, round or ovoid body, formed in certain organisms, and by germination giving rise to a new organism; as, the reproductive spores of bacteria, etc.
  6. One of the parts formed by fission in certain Protozoa. See Spore formation, belw.
  7. A very small grain in flowerless plants which performs the part of a seed.
  8. The reproductive cell of a sporozoan or of a cryptogamous plant; a cell of an inferior order to an ovum orseed.
  9. The reproductive substance of plants which do not flower.
  10. A minute grain which serves as a seed in flowerless plants like the fern.
  11. Minute grain serving as a seed to flowerless plants.
  12. A minute grain serving as a seed of a flowerless plant; a germ.
  13. That part of a flowerless plant which performs the function of the seed.
  14. One of the minute grains in flowerless plants which perform the functions of seeds, as in the ferns and club- mosses.
  15. A highly specialized reproductive cell of plants; a falciform cell of Sporozoa which bores into a mother sperm cell and emerges as an adult.
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Usage examples for spore

  1. Spore formation usually takes place when the conditions pertaining to the growth of the bacteria become unfavorable. – Special Report on Diseases of Cattle by U.S. Department of Agriculture J.R. Mohler
  2. The anthrax spore may live several years in a dried state, but the anthrax bacillus perishes in a few days under like conditions. – Special Report on Diseases of Cattle by U.S. Department of Agriculture J.R. Mohler
  3. What has already been stated concerning the significance of the spore of the anthrax bacillus applies equally well to these bodies. – Special Report on Diseases of Cattle by U.S. Department of Agriculture J.R. Mohler
  4. In other orders the double coating of the spore has been demonstrated. – Fungi: Their Nature and Uses by Mordecai Cubitt Cooke
  5. Each stir of wind brought white spore dust down in a shower from the trees. – The World with a Thousand Moons by Edmond Hamilton
  6. The spores are globose or nearly so, with a large " nucleus" nearly filling the spore – Studies of American Fungi. Mushrooms, Edible, Poisonous, etc. by George Francis Atkinson
  7. He put a professional comment at the end: The culture seems to have retained its normal characteristics during long storage in the spore state. – This World Is Taboo by Murray Leinster
  8. The discovery in 1855, in the Hastings beds of the Isle of Wight, of Gyrogonites, or spore vessels of the Chara, was the first example of that genus of plants, so common in the tertiary strata, being found in a Secondary or Mesozoic rock. – The Student's Elements of Geology by Sir Charles Lyell
  9. These carcasses should be buried deeply, so that spore formation may be prevented and no animal have access to them. – Special Report on Diseases of Cattle by U.S. Department of Agriculture J.R. Mohler
  10. From the tiny spore which in that earlier day was borne so helplessly, had grown a mighty forest. – The Sun's Babies by Edith Howes
  11. He put the block- no longer frosted- in the culture microscope and saw its enclosed, infinitesimal particles of life in the process of multiplying on the food that had been frozen with them when they were reduced to the spore condition. – This World Is Taboo by Murray Leinster
  12. In twelve to fifteen days a second spore develops on the surface, snow- white Penicillium Album. – The Complete Book of Cheese by Robert Carlton Brown
  13. This is known as spore formation. – The Truth About Woman by C. Gasquoine Hartley
  14. In Xenodochus, the highest development of joints is reached, each spore being composed of an indefinite number, from ten to twenty cells. – Fungi: Their Nature and Uses by Mordecai Cubitt Cooke
  15. There would be not a blade of grass, not a living spore not a hidden egg! – Astounding Stories of Super-Science, December 1930 by Various
  16. Destruction of microorganisms in the spore form can be accomplished in a short time by subjecting them to very intense heat. – School and Home Cooking by Carlotta C. Greer
  17. The fruit is also attacked and becomes covered with the mildew- like spore bearing threads of the fungus. – Tomato Culture: A Practical Treatise on the Tomato by William Warner Tracy

Rhymes for spore