Dictionary.net

Definitions of salt

  1. white crystalline form of especially sodium chloride used to season and preserve food
  2. the taste experience when salt is taken into the mouth
  3. add salt to
  4. negotiations between the US and the USSR opened in 1969 in Helsinki designed to limit both countries' stock of nuclear weapons
  5. ( rare; of speech) painful; bitter; " salt scorn"- Shakespeare; " a salt apology"
  6. containing or filled with salt; " salt water"
  7. one of the four basic taste sensations; like the taste of sea water
  8. preserve with salt, as of meats
  9. ( used especially of meats) preserved in salt
  10. negotiations between the United States and the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics opened in 1969 in Helsinki designed to limit both countries' stock of nuclear weapons
  11. a compound formed by replacing hydrogen in an acid by a metal ( or a radical that acts like a metal)
  12. preserve with salt; " people used to salt meats on ships"
  13. add zest or liveliness to; " She salts her lectures with jokes"
  14. sprinkle as if with salt; " the rebels had salted the fields with mines and traps"
  15. of speech that is painful or bitter; " salt scorn"- Shakespeare; " a salt apology"
  16. The chloride of sodium, a substance used for seasoning food, for the preservation of meat, etc. It is found native in the earth, and is also produced, by evaporation and crystallization, from sea water and other water impregnated with saline particles.
  17. Hence, flavor; taste; savor; smack; seasoning.
  18. Hence, also, piquancy; wit; sense; as, Attic salt.
  19. A dish for salt at table; a saltcellar.
  20. The neutral compound formed by the union of an acid and a base; thus, sulphuric acid and iron form the salt sulphate of iron or green vitriol.
  21. Fig.: That which preserves from corruption or error; that which purifies; a corrective; an antiseptic; also, an allowance or deduction; as, his statements must be taken with a grain of salt.
  22. Any mineral salt used as an aperient or cathartic, especially Epsom salts, Rochelle salt, or Glauber's salt.
  23. Marshes flooded by the tide.
  24. Of or relating to salt; abounding in, or containing, salt; prepared or preserved with, or tasting of, salt; salted; as, salt beef; salt water.
  25. Overflowed with, or growing in, salt water; as, a salt marsh; salt grass.
  26. Fig.: Bitter; sharp; pungent.
  27. Fig.: Salacious; lecherous; lustful.
  28. To sprinkle, impregnate, or season with salt; to preserve with salt or in brine; to supply with salt; as, to salt fish, beef, or pork; to salt cattle.
  29. To fill with salt between the timbers and planks, as a ship, for the preservation of the timber.
  30. To deposit salt as a saline solution; as, the brine begins to salt.
  31. The act of leaping or jumping; a leap.
  32. Sulphate of magnesia having cathartic qualities; - originally prepared by boiling down the mineral waters at Epsom, England, - whence the name; afterwards prepared from sea water; but now from certain minerals, as from siliceous hydrate of magnesia.
  33. A sailor; - usually qualified by old.
  34. Chloride of sodium, used for seasoning, and for the preservation of meat, etc.; obtained from the earth or by the evaporation of sea water; a saltcellar; anything like salt; in chemistry, the compound formed by the action of an acid on a metal or an oxide, replacing the hydrogen of the acid with a metal or a metallic element; wit; colloquially, a sailor.
  35. To sprinkle or season with salt.
  36. Flavored or seasoned with salt.
  37. Saltness.
  38. 1. A compound formed by the interaction of and acid and a base, the hydrogen atoms of the acid being replaced by the atoms of the base. 2. Sodium chloride, NaCl, common salt, table salt.
  39. Choride of sodium. An acid compound with a base.
  40. A well- known substance used for seasoning, found either in the earth or obtained by evaporation from sea- water: anything like salt: seasoning: piquancy: ( chem.) a combination of an acid with a base.
  41. Containing salt: tasting of salt: overflowed with or growing in salt water: pungent.
  42. To sprinkle, impregnate, or season with salt; as, to salt fish, beef, or pork: to fill with salt between the timbers and planks, as a ship, for the preservation of the timber.
  43. Containing, or tasting like, salt.
  44. Sodium chloride, used for seasoning; piquancy; compound of an acid and a base.
  45. To apply salt to; cure or season with salt.
  46. Flavored with salt; briny; containing salt. saltish; salty.
  47. A compound of chlorin and sodium, abundant in sea- water.
  48. A compound of any base with an acid.
  49. Having the taste of salt; impregnated or abounding with salt; overflowed with or growing among salt; salacious; pungent or bitter; dear.
  50. Chloride of sodium, a substance used for seasoning food, for the preservation of meat, & c.; a body composed of an acid and a base; taste; anything like salt; smack; wit; piquancy; a salter- cellar; a sailor.
  51. To sprinkle, impregnate, or season with salt; to fill with salt.
  52. To deposit salt from a saline substance.
  53. A common culinary substance, obtained from sea- water, salt- springs, and from mines; in chem., called chloride of sodium; a term applied to a combination of an acid with an alkaline base; that which preserves from corruption; figuratively, wit; piquancy.
  54. Having the taste of salt; impregnated with salt.
  55. To season, sprinkle, or impregnate with salt.
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Antonyms for salt

dull, fresh, freshwater, pure, sweet, clear.

Quotes of salt

  1. A day without an argument is like an egg without salt – Angela Carter
  2. The cure for anything is salt water: sweat, tears or the sea. – Isak Dinesen
  3. I have a home in Salt Lake, and I have a home in Malibu, at the beach. – Roma Downey
  4. Be not affronted at a joke. If one throw salt at thee, thou wilt receive no harm, unless thou art raw. – Oliver Goldsmith
  5. Many a man gets weary of clamping down on his rough impulses, which if given occasional release would encourage the living of life with salt in it, in place of dust. – Henry S. Haskins
  6. Yesterday the flame of the Olympic torch was carried through our great state on its way to Salt Lake City. – Jane D. Hull
  7. The outdoors, the beautiful environment, both in fresh and salt water. And the thing that concerns me is the amount of kids that stand on street corners, or go into pinball parlours, and call it recreation. – Rex Hunt
  8. I left Montana in Spring of 1866, for Utah, arriving at Salt Lake city during the summer. – Calamity Jane
  9. What I know about Mike Tyson, I see in the boxing ring. As far as all of the gossip stuff that I hear about him, I know first hand to take that with a grain of salt – Gerald McRaney
  10. I lost 90 pounds and my blood pressure went down to a normal level and the salt in my urine disappeared. And that was when I had to make the transition from fat character actor to thin character actor. – Ron Perlman
  11. No man is worth his salt who is not ready at all times to risk his well -being, to risk his body, to risk his life, in a great cause. – Theodore Roosevelt
  12. Hemingway hated me. I sold 200 million books, and he didn't. Of course most of mine sold for 25 cents, but still... you look at all this stuff with a grain of salt – Mickey Spillane
  13. But in answer to your question about the conspiracy angle, I think that any historian worth his salt and this is where I fault Stephen Ambrose and a lot of these guys who attack me- not all of life is a result of conspiracy by any means! Accident occurs alongside conspiracy. – Oliver Stone
  14. When Alexander of Macedon was 33, he cried salt tears because there were no more worlds to conquer. Eric Bristow is only 27. – Sid Waddell

Usage examples for salt

  1. Let bread and salt water and herbs only be thy portion. – A Maid at King Alfred’s Court by Lucy Foster Madison
  2. He had eaten their bread and salt – The Law of Hemlock Mountain by Hugh Lundsford
  3. Nora, bring the salt please. – The Curlytops on Star Island by Howard R. Garis
  4. And you bet Old Salt will have a plenty big object in view in keeping out Lanpher and Tweezy. – The Heart of the Range by William Patterson White
  5. Take fayre Flowre, Sugre, Safroun, an Salt – Early English Meals and Manners by Various
  6. But my life is in your hands, Master, and I have shared your salt – The Flying Legion by George Allan England
  7. She's a whole salt mine. – The High Calling by Charles M. Sheldon
  8. The streams are salt – The Panjab, North-West Frontier Province, and Kashmir by Sir James McCrone Douie
  9. We are going to the salt springs." – Umboo, the Elephant by Howard R. Garis
  10. Do you think your mother, if she is alive, would like to think of your standing over that old wretch while he was whipped and whipped and washed with salt water, maybe? – Duffels by Edward Eggleston
  11. " I am afraid poor Morton's love is too deep- seated to be worked off by salt water or absence. – An Old Sailor's Yarns by Nathaniel Ames
  12. I took what I wanted, every man worth his salt does. – The Complete PG Edition of The Works of Winston Churchill by Winston Churchill
  13. I've been to sea in my day, and am not afraid of a little water, salt or fresh. – From Jest to Earnest by E. P. Roe
  14. The feeling of the cool ocean breeze and smell of the salt air will have vanished completely." – A Practical Guide to Self-Hypnosis by Melvin Powers
  15. In Africa, or here, I shall always love you; and many a salt tear I shall shed for you yet, many a one I have, as well you know. – A Simpleton by Charles Reade
  16. Change water twice the first day, afterward every day, until it has not the least salt taste. – Dishes & Beverages of the Old South by Martha McCulloch Williams
  17. " He was a gallant fellow, and would have made a thorough seaman," said Captain Weber, as he joined the party below, dashing the salt foam from his eyes and hair as he spoke. – The Ruined Cities of Zululand by Hugh Mulleneux Walmsley
  18. Spirit of Salt – The Book of Household Management by Mrs. Isabella Beeton
  19. " You go ahead, and I'll get some salt for the sheep," said Donald. – Uncle Robert's Geography (Uncle Robert's Visit, V.3) by Francis W. Parker and Nellie Lathrop Helm
  20. Some of these are formed in the body, while others, like common salt enter as a part of the food. – Physiology and Hygiene for Secondary Schools by Francis M. Walters, A.M.

Rhymes for salt