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Definitions of relief

  1. the feeling that comes when something burdensome is removed or reduced; " as he heard the news he was suddenly flooded with relief"
  2. the act of reducing something unpleasant ( as pain or annoyance); " he asked the nurse for relief from the constant pain"
  3. someone who takes the place of another ( as when things get dangerous or difficult); " the star had a stand- in for dangerous scenes"; " we need extra employees for summer fill- ins"
  4. the condition of being comfortable or relieved ( especially after being relieved of distress); " he enjoyed his relief from responsibility"; " getting it off his conscience gave him some ease"
  5. a change for the better
  6. sculpture consisting of shapes carved on a surface so as to stand out from the surrounding background
  7. assistance in time of difficulty; " the contributions provided some relief for the victims"
  8. a pause for relaxation; " people actually accomplish more when they take time for short rests"
  9. the act of freeing a city or town that has been besieged; " he asked for troops for the relief of Atlanta"
  10. aid for the aged or indigent or handicapped; " he has been on relief for many years"
  11. ( law) redress awarded by a court; " was the relief supposed to be protection from future harm or compensation for past injury?"
  12. The act of relieving, or the state of being relieved; the removal, or partial removal, of any evil, or of anything oppressive or burdensome, by which some ease is obtained; succor; alleviation; comfort; ease; redress.
  13. Release from a post, or from the performance of duty, by the intervention of others, by discharge, or by relay; as, a relief of a sentry.
  14. That which removes or lessens evil, pain, discomfort, uneasiness, etc.; that which gives succor, aid, or comfort; also, the person who relieves from performance of duty by taking the place of another; a relay.
  15. A fine or composition which the heir of a deceased tenant paid to the lord for the privilege of taking up the estate, which, on strict feudal principles, had lapsed or fallen to the lord on the death of the tenant.
  16. The projection of a figure above the ground or plane on which it is formed.
  17. The appearance of projection given by shading, shadow, etc., to any figure.
  18. The height to which works are raised above the bottom of the ditch.
  19. The elevations and surface undulations of a country.
  20. Removal in whole or in part of pain, grief, want, etc.; the feeling caused by such removal; that which removes or lessens pain, grief, etc.; release from some post of duty; help given to the poor; fresh supplies of men, animals, food, etc., especially fresh troops, coming to take the place of those tired out or used up; the elevation of a sculptured design from a plane surface; as, the figures carved in relief on old furniture; in painting and drawing, the effect of standing out from the surface given to objects in the picture by shadows, etc.; in physical geography, the elevations and depressions of land surface.
  21. The removal of pain or distress, physical or mental.
  22. The removal of any evil: release from a post or duty: that which relieves or mitigates: aid: ( fine art) the projection of a sculptured design from its ground.
  23. Ease; succor; release; in the fine arts, projection of a figure.
  24. A relieving; alleviation; aid; release.
  25. The projection of a figure from a surface.
  26. Alleviation of pain, grief, & c.; that which alleviates; release, as a sentinel, from his post; the one who takes his place; aid; redress; prominence in sculpture, beyond the ground or plane on which it is formed. See Relieve.
  27. Removal in whole or in part of any evil, grievance, or affliction; that which mitigates; help; succour; remedy; dismission of a sentinel from his post; in the feudal law, a payment made to the lord by the tenant on coming into possession of an estate to be held under him; in fort., the projection or prominence of a work above the ground- plan; in the fine arts, the appearance of projection in painting; in sculp., the projection of figures from the ground or plane on which they are formed, being of three kinds- alto- relievo, or high relief, mezzo- relievo, medium or middle relief, basso- relievo, or low relief.
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Usage examples for relief

  1. They are weary of themselves and of each other, and expect to find relief in new companions. – Rasselas, Prince of Abyssinia by Samuel Johnson
  2. She added that it would be a relief when he was gone, for he would then be out of pain. – Love's Final Victory by Horatio
  3. Wharton drew a breath of relief – Marcella by Mrs. Humphry Ward
  4. The boy breathed a sigh of relief – The Boy With the U. S. Foresters by Francis Rolt-Wheeler
  5. It was a relief in fact, to find that I was able to close the door without making a sound. – The Prairie Mother by Arthur Stringer
  6. I'm sure it must be a relief to him. – Barbara in Brittany by E. A. Gillie
  7. Mr. Olstein drew a long breath of relief – The White Wolf and Other Fireside Tales by Arthur Thomas Quiller-Couch
  8. She heard him with relief – Nan of Music Mountain by Frank H. Spearman
  9. " O, then," he returned, in a tone of relief how could I? – The Seaboard Parish, Complete by George MacDonald
  10. Then, to their surprise and relief he turned and went out of the gate! – The Ragged Trousered Philanthropists by Robert Tressell
  11. I really thought it would be a relief to you to have him taken away from you for a little while just now, and I still think it is best; but not unless you consent. – The Melting of Molly by Maria Thompson Daviess
  12. When this thought came to Cecile, she gave a sigh of relief – The Children's Pilgrimage by L. T. Meade
  13. The return of Noel a few minutes later was a relief to them both. – The Keeper of the Door by Ethel M. Dell
  14. " Let's have a bit of a relief answered, Allerdyke suddenly. – The Rayner-Slade Amalgamation by J. S. Fletcher
  15. Yet her relief was short- lived. – The Gray Mask by Wadsworth Camp
  16. That is some relief – Partners of the Out-Trail by Harold Bindloss
  17. Relief should have come long before; but no one came. – The Indian Drum by William MacHarg Edwin Balmer
  18. Relief showed on his face. – The Lost Warship by Robert Moore Williams
  19. Then it was a relief – Ranching for Sylvia by Harold Bindloss
  20. When I received it and put it on, for the first time, I felt instant relief and knew then that it was going to do me good. – Cluthe's Advice to the Ruptured by Chas. Cluthe & Sons
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