reciprocal

[ɹ_ɪ_s_ˈɪ_p_ɹ_ə_k_əl], [ɹɪsˈɪpɹəkə͡l], [ɹɪsˈɪpɹəkə‍l]

Antonyms for reciprocal:

dissociated, unconnected, separated, disconnected, disunited, separate, Sundered, unrequited, unreciprocated, distinct, direct, nonreciprocal, unanswered, severed, nonreciprocating, detached, unshared.


Definitions of reciprocal:

  1.   of words or propositions so related that each is the negation of the other; "` male' and ` female' are complementary terms" – Wordnet Dictionary DB
  2.   That which is reciprocal: ( math.) unity divided by any quantity. – The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  3.   ( math) one of a pair of numbers whose product is 1: the reciprocal of 2/ 3 is 3/ 2; the inverse of 7 is 1/ 7 – Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4.   Used to denote different kinds of mutual relation; often with reference to the substitution of reciprocals for given quantities. See the Phrases below. – Newage Dictionary DB
  5.   Mutually interchangeable. – Newage Dictionary DB
  6.   Alternate; mutual; reflexive. – Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  7.   Reciprocally. – The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  8.   That which is given or done by each to the other; the quotient obtained by dividing unity by a number. – The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  9.   hybridization involving a pair of crosses that reverse the sexes associated with each genotype – Wordnet Dictionary DB
  10.   Acting in return: mutual: given and received. – The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  11.   Alternate; mutually interchangeable. – Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  12.   Recurring in vicissitude; alternate. – Newage Dictionary DB
  13.   Mutually interchangeable, so that each may be the equivalent of the other. – The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  14.   Reflexive; - applied to pronouns and verbs, but sometimes limited to such pronouns as express mutual action. – Newage Dictionary DB
  15.   concerning each of two or more persons or things; especially given or done in return; " reciprocal aid"; " reciprocal trade"; " reciprocal respect"; " reciprocal privileges at other clubs" – Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  16.   Mutual; done, given, or offered by each to the other; as, reciprocal benefits; offered in return for something done or given; as, reciprocal conditions; in grammar, showing action upon, or relation of, each to the other; as, reciprocal pronouns ( each other, one another). – The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  17.   of or relating to the multiplicative inverse of a quantity or function; " the reciprocal ratio of a: b is b: a" – Wordnet Dictionary DB
  18.   ( mathematics) one of a pair of numbers whose product is 1: the reciprocal of 2/ 3 is 3/ 2; the multiplicative inverse of 7 is 1/ 7 – Wordnet Dictionary DB
  19.   In arith., the quotient resulting from the division of unity by any given number. – Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  20.   Reciprocal. – Newage Dictionary DB
  21.   That which is reciprocal to another thing. – Newage Dictionary DB
  22.   something ( a term or expression or concept) that has a reciprocal relation to something else; " risk is the reciprocal of safety" – Wordnet Dictionary DB
  23.   That which is reciprocal; the quotient that arises from dividing unity by a given number. Reciprocal ratio, the ratio between reciprocals of two quantities. Reciprocal terms, terms that have the same signification, and are mutually convertible. – Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  24.   Mutual; alternating. – The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  25.   Done by each to the other; interchanging or interchanged; given and received; due from each to each; mutual; as, reciprocal love; reciprocal duties. – Newage Dictionary DB
  26.   Mutual; given and received. – The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  27.   concerning each of two or more persons or things; especially given or done in return; " reciprocal aid"; " reciprocal trade"; " mutual respect"; " reciprocal privileges at other clubs" – Wordnet Dictionary DB
  28.   The quotient arising from dividing unity by any quantity; thus, is the reciprocal of 4; 1( a + b) is the reciprocal of a + b. The reciprocal of a fraction is the fraction inverted, or the denominator divided by the numerator. – Newage Dictionary DB

Quotes for reciprocal:

  1. Insofar as international law is observed, it provides us with stability and order and with a means of predicting the behavior of those with whom we have reciprocal legal obligations. – J. William Fulbright
  2. Both of these branches of evolutionary science, are, in my opinion, in the closest causal connection; this arises from the reciprocal action of the laws of heredity and adaptation. – Ernst Haeckel
  3. Only now did I recognize the reciprocal relationship which exits between manufacturing power and the national system of transportation, and that the one can never develop to its fullest without the other. – Friedrich List
  4. The concentration and reciprocal effect of industry and agriculture conjoin in a growth of productive powers, which increases more in geometrical than in arithmetical proportion. – Friedrich List
  5. All creatures are united to God alone in an immediate union. They depend essentially and directly upon Him. Being all alike equally impotent, they cannot be in reciprocal dependence upon one another. – Nicolas Malebranche
  6. He has willed- He wills incessantly- that the modifications of the mind and those of the body shall be reciprocal This is the conjunction and the natural dependence of the two parts of which we are constituted. – Nicolas Malebranche
  7. I like to believe that love is a reciprocal thing, that it can't really be felt, truly, by one. – Sean Penn
  8. Love is a reciprocal torture. – Marcel Proust
  9. Information: the negative reciprocal value of probability. – Claude Shannon
  10. Every relationship between persons causes a picture of each to take form in the mind of the other, and this picture evidently is in reciprocal relationship with that personal relationship. – Georg Simmel
  11. The first internal relation that is essential to a secret society is the reciprocal confidence of its members. – Georg Simmel
  12. There are many benefits to this process of listening. The first is that good listeners are created as people feel listened to. Listening is a reciprocal process- we become more attentive to others if they have attended to us. – Margaret J. Wheatley

Usage examples for reciprocal:

  1. The regard was reciprocal – Haydn by J. Cuthbert Hadden
  2. The Rule of 1223, on the other hand, is a reciprocal contract. ” – Life of St. Francis of Assisi by Paul Sabatier
  3. “ I. City and country are still so widely apart in every civilization that one can safely count upon a reciprocal strangeness in many every- day things. ” – Short Stories and Essays From "Literature and Life" by William Dean Howells
  4. The reciprocal fact- of a corresponding export of the metal over whose head the premium offered- does not emerge so distinctly, simply by reason of the complication of the subject of exports of metals with the wider general movement of trade balances. ” – The History of Currency, 1252 to 1896 by William Arthur Shaw
  5. At times I become consciously and acutely aware of the reciprocal flow of openness in the dialogue. ” – Humanistic-Nursing by Paterson, Josephine G.
  6. “ No one doubts that the speculative movement affects the social and political- I think that less attention has been given to the reciprocal influence. ” – English Literature and Society in the Eighteenth Century by Leslie Stephen
  7. In this novel many social grades are gathered together, and the reciprocal actions of their representative members are rendered with effective contrast and a good deal of dramatic quickness. ” – Balzac by Frederick Lawton
  8. Before I quitted Cadiz, which my engagements rendered imperative, I obtained from her a reciprocal acknowledgment. ” – The Pacha of Many Tales by Captain Frederick Marryat
  9. These two work on each other a reciprocal increase. ” – The Expositor's Bible: Colossians and Philemon by Alexander Maclaren
  10. What but community of sentiments, similarity of principles, reciprocal sympathies, and an equal ardour for and love of truth? ” – Anna St. Ives by Thomas Holcroft
  11. There is a marriage of good and truth, also of truth and good, in every particular of the Word, in order that it may be a source of wisdom to angels and of intelligence to men, for from good alone no wisdom or intelligence is born, neither from truth alone, but from their marriage when the love is reciprocal – Spiritual Life and the Word of God by Emanuel Swedenborg
  12. The judge, a royal officer of high rank, supplies the expert knowledge, while the lay influence is exerted by means of a panel of twelve men of average ignorance, drawn from the community by lot for the occasion; and although this is not the usual method of combining the two elements, their reciprocal control has certainly been effective. ” – The Government of England (Vol. I) by A. Lawrence Lowell
  13. And the further civilization and the connections between different people proceed with this development, the more necessary and, at the same time, possible it becomes to raise the interests and sentiments which would hold them together above those which would keep them asunder, and to thus found a policy of reciprocal equity and of peace in place of a policy of hostile precautions and continual strife. ” – A Popular History of France From The Earliest Times Volume I. of VI. by Francois Pierre Guillaume Guizot
  14. Quite unexpected, however, was the reciprocal loftiness of tone spontaneously adopted by the young English squire, for whom, in consequence, he conceived a cordial relish; and as he paced in the footsteps of Arthur, anxious to quiet his curiosity by hearing how it had fared with one whom he had to suppose the second applicant, he kept ejaculating: 'Not a bit! ” – The Complete Project Gutenberg Works of George Meredith by George Meredith
  15. We forcibly described to him the reciprocal affection of the two young people, and did not fail to bring to his observation Murat's devoted attachment to his person, his splendid courage and noble conduct in Egypt. ” – The Project Gutenberg Memoirs of Napoleon Bonaparte by Bourrienne, Constant, and Stewarton
  16. Somerset participated in his pleasure, and with reciprocal warmth accepted the invitation to accompany him to Villanow. ” – Thaddeus of Warsaw by Jane Porter
  17. His theory of the arts in their reciprocal relations and affinities throws interesting light upon the qualities of his own genius and his method in practice. ” – The Life of Michelangelo Buonarroti by John Addington Symonds
  18. The reciprocal action of spirit and matter is the one great mystery which, to all appearance, must remain impenetrable to the finite intelligence. ” – Christian Mysticism by William Ralph Inge
  19. The reciprocal arrangements are like this; the party of the first part gets the money; the party of the second part, the experience. ” – Seeds of Pine by Janey Canuck
  20. They both act as reciprocal cause and effect, and a change in neither alone will bring the desired effect. ” – The Souls of Black Folk by W. E. B. Du Bois

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