Dictionary.net

Definitions of range

  1. an area in which something acts or operates or has power or control: " the range of a supersonic jet"; " the ambit of municipal legislation"; " within the compass of this article"; " within the scope of an investigation"; " outside the reach of the law"; " in the political orbit of a world power"
  2. lay out in a line
  3. feed as in a meadow or pasture; " the herd was grazing"
  4. a series of hills or mountains; " the valley was between two ranges of hills"; " the plains lay just beyond the mountain range"
  5. the limit of capability; " within the compass of education"
  6. a kitchen appliance used for cooking food; " dinner was already on the stove"
  7. have a range; be capable of projecting over a certain distance, as of a gun; " This gun ranges over two miles"
  8. a place for shooting ( firing or driving) projectiles of various kinds; " the army maintains a missile range in the desert"; " any good golf club will have a range where you can practice"
  9. a variety of different things or activities; " he answered a range of questions"; " he was impressed by the range and diversity of the collection"
  10. the limits within which something can be effective; " range of motion"; " he was beyond the reach of their fire"
  11. a large tract of grassy open land on which livestock can graze; " they used to drive the cattle across the open range every spring"; " he dreamed of a home on the range"
  12. the limits of the values a function can take; " the range of this function is the interval from 0 to 1"
  13. let eat; " range the animals in the prairie"
  14. assign a rank or rating to; " how would you rank these students?"; " The restaurant is rated highly in the food guide"
  15. change or be different within limits; " Estimates for the losses in the earthquake range as high as $ 2 billion"; " Interest rates run from 5 to 10 percent"; " The instruments ranged from tuba to cymbals"; " My students range from very bright to dull"
  16. range or extend over; occupy a certain area; " The plants straddle the entire state"
  17. move about aimlessly or without any destination, often in search of food or employment; " The gypsies roamed the woods"; " roving vagabonds"; " the wandering Jew"; " The cattle roam across the prairie"; " the laborers drift from one town to the next".
  18. To set in a row, or in rows; to place in a regular line or lines, or in ranks; to dispose in the proper order; to rank; as, to range soldiers in line.
  19. To separate into parts; to sift.
  20. To dispose in a classified or in systematic order; to arrange regularly; as, to range plants and animals in genera and species.
  21. To rove over or through; as, to range the fields.
  22. To sail or pass in a direction parallel to or near; as, to range the coast.
  23. To be native to, or to live in; to frequent.
  24. To rove at large; to wander without restraint or direction; to roam.
  25. To have range; to change or differ within limits; to be capable of projecting, or to admit of being projected, especially as to horizontal distance; as, the temperature ranged through seventy degrees Fahrenheit; the gun ranges three miles; the shot ranged four miles.
  26. To be placed in order; to be ranked; to admit of arrangement or classification; to rank.
  27. To be native to, or live in, a certain district or region; as, the peba ranges from Texas to Paraguay.
  28. A series of things in a line; a row; a rank; as, a range of buildings; a range of mountains.
  29. An aggregate of individuals in one rank or degree; an order; a class.
  30. The step of a ladder; a rung.
  31. A kitchen grate.
  32. An extended cooking apparatus of cast iron, set in brickwork, and affording conveniences for various ways of cooking; also, a kind of cooking stove.
  33. A bolting sieve to sift meal.
  34. A wandering or roving; a going to and fro; an excursion; a ramble; an expedition.
  35. That which may be ranged over; place or room for excursion; especially, a region of country in which cattle or sheep may wander and pasture.
  36. Extent or space taken in by anything excursive; compass or extent of excursion; reach; scope; discursive power; as, the range of one's voice, or authority.
  37. The region within which a plant or animal naturally lives.
  38. The horizontal distance to which a shot or other projectile is carried.
  39. Sometimes, less properly, the trajectory of a shot or projectile.
  40. A place where shooting, as with cannons or rifles, is practiced.
  41. In the public land system of the United States, a row or line of townships lying between two successive meridian lines six miles apart.
  42. See Range of cable, below.
  43. To place ( as a single individual) among others in a line, row, or order, as in the ranks of an army; - usually, reflexively and figuratively, ( in the sense) to espouse a cause, to join a party, etc.
  44. To have a certain direction; to correspond in direction; to be or keep in a corresponding line; to trend or run; - often followed by with; as, the front of a house ranges with the street; to range along the coast.
  45. See of cable, below.
  46. A line or row; a chain; as, a range of mountains; line of direction; as, the big tree in range with my window; entire space or time covered; as, the whole range of history; a great tract of land over which cattle graze; the entire region in which an animal or plant lives; as, the geographical range of certain birds; scope or extent; as, a range of ideas; carrying power, or reach; as, the range of a voice; distance to which a shot, etc., can be sent; place for shooting at a mark; a large cooking stove.
  47. To set or arrange in a row; to take sides with; as, to range oneself with a political party; place in proper order; classify; rove over; as, cattle range the plains.
  48. To wander; roam; to go over or through a place in order to explore it; to lie in the same direction; to go; as, the bullet ranged wide of the mark; to be placed in order; as, they range in height from four to six feet.
  49. To rank or set in a row: to place in proper order: to rove or pass over: to sail in a direction parallel to.
  50. To be placed in order: to lie in a particular direction: to rove at large: to sail or pass near.
  51. A row or rank: a class or order. a wandering: room for passing to and fro: space occupied by anything moving: capacity of mind: extent of acquirements: the horizontal distance to which a shot is carried: the long cooking- stove of a kitchen: ( B.) a chimney- rack.
  52. A row; order; room for roving or traversing; extent; cooking- stove.
  53. To be placed in order; rove.
  54. To place in a row, or in order; rove through.
  55. To pass through, by, or over; wander along.
  56. To arrange; array.
  57. To classify; rank.
  58. To lie in the same direction; have equal rank followed by with.
  59. The area over which anything moves; a tract of grazing land; reach, as of voice or shot.
  60. A line or row; class or series.
  61. A cooking stove.
  62. A row; a class; excursion; space or room for excursion; extent of excursion or of discourse; power; a kitchen- grate or cooking apparatus; the horizontal distance to which a projectile is carried. See Rank.
  63. To set in a row; to dispose in proper order; to rove over; to sail along.
  64. To rove at large; to be placed in order; to lie in a particular direction; to sail or pass near.
  65. A rank; a row; a class or order; things in a line; compass or extent of excursion, or space or room for it; compass taken in; an extended kitchen apparatus for cooking; a piece of wood fixed to the inside of a ship to belay the ropes; the distance to which a shot can be projected or thrown from a gun; the line a shot describes to the point where it lodges; a bolting- sieve to sift meal.
  66. To set or place in a row or line; to dispose in proper order; to pass over, or from one point to another; to rove at large; to lie in a particular direction; to travel about without restraint or direction; to separate the flower from the bran, as to range through a sieve.
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Quotes of range

  1. It's really been a better situation for me being with the Crush than it would if I were with the Broncos because this has given me a lot more broad range – John Elway
  2. Parochial schools in the United States are also responsible for educating students from a wide range of ethnic backgrounds, including many who are non -Catholic. – Mark Foley
  3. The plausible outcomes range from the gradual and benign to the more precipitous and damaging. – Timothy Geithner
  4. Other, far fewer, directors are more like the composer- conceptualizing the piece, scoring it, distributing its musical lines among a range of registers, chords, and instruments. – Thomas Harrison
  5. I'm not writing just about melancholy stuff anymore, I made a point to cover a wide range of emotions. – Chantal Kreviazuk
  6. We will announce a new offering, where you can get a CA expert on your PC live, via video, on a range of topics about a product. – Sanjay Kumar
  7. The undisturbed coastal plain is home to a wide variety of plants and animals and is the only wilderness sanctuary in North America that protects a complete range of the arctic ecosystem. – Dan Lipinski
  8. The Latin musical tradition is very rich and gives the singer a lot of freedom to explore a range of. – Ednita Nazario
  9. Reading, like writing, is a creative act. If readers only bring a narrow range of themselves to the book, then they'll only see their narrow range reflected in it. – Ben Okri
  10. Maybe the higher echelons of my range aren't as easily accessible, but that's OK; you change the key. – Elaine Paige
  11. This is very similar to astronomy where different magnitudes are assigned to the brightness of an astronomical object, depending on the range of wavelengths being measured. – Charles Francis Richter
  12. Test ideas in the marketplace. You learn from hearing a range of perspectives. Consultation helps engender the support decisions need to be successfully implemented. – Donald Rumsfeld
  13. Oh who can tell the range of joy or set the bounds of beauty? – Sara Teasdale
  14. The show I did in England catered to a broad range of people. I like that. I don't want nouveau cult status, though I know we've got that sort of audience in the states. – Tracey Ullman

Usage examples for range

  1. Our men, too, began to fall; for as we drew nearer we were in the most deadly range and the long guns of the Amabuna shot both strong and true. – The White Shield by Bertram Mitford
  2. And you'll be under the Corporal's orders about range and distance, and keepin' out of the hands of- the other side. – The Dop Doctor by Clotilde Inez Mary Graves
  3. " They have got the range now," cried Jack; " it is time to reply to them." – The Three Lieutenants by W.H.G. Kingston
  4. No racin' on the Range – Rebel Spurs by Andre Norton
  5. At any rate it is beyond the range of our present knowledge. – The Gospel of the Hereafter by J. Paterson-Smyth
  6. " It will be the range land, I take it, if it's on this side," Sir Redmond remarked. – Her Prairie Knight by B.M. Sinclair, AKA B. M. Bower
  7. He said, Don't be alarmed; you are out of range – Strange True Stories of Louisiana by George Washington Cable
  8. Each was allowed three trial shots to get the range – The Boy Scouts in A Trapper's Camp by Thornton W. Burgess
  9. That is impossible in the range of a study like this. – Modern Religious Cults and Movements by Gaius Glenn Atkins
  10. Get beyond the hunter's range – My Daily Meditation for the Circling Year by John Henry Jowett
  11. You are in range – My Lady of the North by Randall Parrish
  12. So much was still quite clear and recent, within range of days. – Where the Pavement Ends by John Russell
  13. The chauffeur, Karl, passed across Renwick's range of vision and the steps of Goritz resumed their pacing of the floor- more slowly now. – The Secret Witness by George Gibbs
  14. " But not off the Great Range that's out of the question. – The Thing in the Attic by James Benjamin Blish
  15. Over that last mountain range said Burl, pointing. – The Secret of the Ninth Planet by Donald Allen Wollheim
  16. The range is nothing but three hundred feet, right? – Someone Comes to Town, Someone Leaves Town by Cory Doctorow
  17. The paint on her face made her look ghastly at close range – Francezka by Molly Elliot Seawell
  18. But, again, there is this mountain- range between us- that you do not believe me. – The Works of Robert Louis Stevenson - Swanston Edition Vol. 24 (of 25) by Robert Louis Stevenson Other: Andrew Lang
  19. Of course, he may have changed his mind and gone off to some other part of the range – With Hoops of Steel by Florence Finch Kelly
  20. We rode together on the Chiracahua range – The Killer by Stewart Edward White

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