punch

[p_ˈʌ_n_tʃ], [pˈʌnt͡ʃ], [pˈʌnt‍ʃ]

Antonyms for punch:

debilitation, puniness, infirmity, impotence, lethargy, faintness, tenderness, weakness, skim, indolence, frazzle, weariness, frailty, delicacy, burnout, slightness, tiredness, powerlessness, disablement, kiss, enfeeblement, laziness, nudge, torpidity, impotency, inanition, sluggishness, lassitude, enervation, fatigue, prostration, frailness, feebleness, collapse, debility, listlessness, shave, softness, exhaustion.


Definitions of punch:

  1.   A beverage composed of wine or distilled liquor, water ( or milk), sugar, and the juice of lemon, with spice or mint; -- specifically named from the kind of spirit used; as rum punch, claret punch, champagne punch, etc. – Newage Dictionary DB
  2.   A drink whose use and manufacture was originally obtained from India; a well- known beverage composed of spirit and water, sweetened with sugar, and flavoured with lemon- juice. – Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  3.   A tool or machine for perforating or indenting. – The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  4.   To perforate or make holes in with a punch; to strike with the fist. – The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  5.   A short, fat fellow; anything short and thick. – Newage Dictionary DB
  6.   drive forcibly as if by a punch; " the nail punched through the wall" – Wordnet Dictionary DB
  7.   A drink of wine or spirits, sweetened, flavored, and diluted with water. – The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  8.   To perforate or pierce with a steel tool by stamping out a piece. – Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  9.   deliver a punch to – Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  10.   A thick- set horse; a short fat fellow. – Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  11.   A tool for stamping holes; a thrust. – The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  12.   A beverage of five ingredients, spirit, water, sugar, lemon juice, and spice. – The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  13.   A drink of spirits and water, sweetened and flavored. – The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  14.   A prop, as for the roof of a mine. – Newage Dictionary DB
  15.   1. An instrument for making a hole or indentation in some solid material or for driving out a foreign body inserted in a hole in such material. 2. an instrument for extracting the root of a tooth. – A practical medical dictionary. By Stedman, Thomas Lathrop. Published 1920.
  16.   A stroke or thrust with the fist or with the elbow. – Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  17.   To perforate or stamp with an instrument by pressure, or a blow; as, to punch a hole; to punch ticket. – Newage Dictionary DB
  18.   To thrust against; to poke; as, to punch one with the end of a stick or the elbow. – Newage Dictionary DB
  19.   make a hole into or between, as for ease of separation; " perforate the sheets of paper" – Wordnet Dictionary DB
  20.   The mock - hero in a comic performance of puppets. – The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  21.   ( boxing) a blow with the fist; " I gave him a clout on his nose" – Wordnet Dictionary DB
  22.   A tool of iron or steel for piercing holes by stamping out a piece. – Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  23.   Contr. Of PUNCHINELLO. – The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  24.   To thrust against. – The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  25.   A tool for stamping or perforating, a kind of awl. – The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  26.   To perforate with a punch; thrust. – The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  27.   One of a breed of large, heavy draught horses; as, the Suffolk punch. – Newage Dictionary DB
  28.   The chief character in a well- known puppet- exhibition; an English journal, with illustrations conceived in a humorous vein, conducted in satire, from a liberal Englishman's standpoint, of the follies and weaknesses of the leaders of public opinion and fashion in modern social life. – Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  29.   A blow or thrust. – Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  30.   deliver a quick blow to; " he punched me in the stomach" – Wordnet Dictionary DB
  31.   A tool for making dents or holes; a drink made of rum, whisky, etc., combined with water, lemonjuice, and sugar; a blow or thrust, especially with the fist. – The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  32.   To beat or strike. – Newage Dictionary DB
  33.   A beverage of Indian origin, consisting originally of five ingredients, spirit, water, sugar, lemon- juice, and spice; spirit diluted with water, sweetened with sugar, and flavoured with lemon juice; whisky diluted with hot water, and sweetened with sugar, called in Scotland toddy. – Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  34.   To strike or hit, esp. on the head. – The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  35.   A for punching holes in sheet metal, having a small conical center to insure correct locating. – Webster Dictionary DB
  36.   A blow, thrust, poke, or nudge. – The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  37.   Puncher. – The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  38.   A for making indentations or dots in a piece of work, as for suspension between lathe centers, etc. – Webster Dictionary DB
  39.   A thrust or blow. – Newage Dictionary DB
  40.   The buffoon or harlequin of a puppet show. – Newage Dictionary DB
  41.   To perforate with an iron instrument. – Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  42.   A punch for making indentations or dots in a piece of work, as for suspension between lathe centers, etc. – Newage Dictionary DB
  43.   A tool, usually of steel, variously shaped at one end for different uses, and either solid, for stamping or for perforating holes in metallic plates and other substances, or hollow and sharpedged, for cutting out blanks, as for buttons, steel pens, jewelry, and the like; a die. – Newage Dictionary DB
  44.   An extension piece applied to the top of a pile; a dolly. – Newage Dictionary DB
  45.   A figure in a puppet- show; buffoon. – The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  46.   An iron instrument for stamping or perforating holes. – Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  47.   To make a hole or indentation in. – The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  48.   an iced mixed drink usually containing alcohol and prepared for multiple servings; normally served in a punch bowl – Wordnet Dictionary DB
  49.   To prick or pierce with something sharp: to perforate with a steel tool. – The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  50.   To strike or thrust with the fist or the elbow. – Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  51.   A short thick fellow; a stage- puppet, of which punchinello seems to be a diminutive. – Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  52.   a tool for making ( usually circular) holes – Wordnet Dictionary DB
  53.   A punch for punching holes in sheet metal, having a small conical center to insure correct locating. – Newage Dictionary DB

Quotes for punch:

  1. I'd take precision any day over power; as far as being tactical you know you have to see what's going on in there and also understand that for every punch that you or your opponent throws there's always a counter shot or two which you have to be ready to fire or defend. – Alexis Arguello
  2. When a kid can understand that a word can mean two things, there's some real thinking going on. They have a vested interest in finding out what a word means, because it's the punch line to a joke. – Brian P. Cleary
  3. I have just come from a couple of raids, where we had a very lively time, and some of them had to pull their guns. I found it necessary to punch a few sports myself. – Richard H. Davis
  4. My father who in this case was an obsessive life -long storyteller, and by a very peculiar trick of my father's. My father would tell a very, very long story, and the punch line would be in Yiddish. – Stephen Greenblatt
  5. I don't think there's a punch -line scheduled, is there? – Vince Lombardi
  6. For me, it's a bigger challenge, it's much harder to do and much more rewarding to do well, then just to think up stuff of your own, hit or miss, because you've got to see to it that you don't torpedo any of his punch lines. – Humphrey Lyttelton
  7. Also, if you watch the film once, there are lots of things that you won't get because there are punch lines in the first act, the setup to which isn't until the second act. – Simon Pegg
  8. I never direct myself, because I don't like working with me. I would punch me in the mouth if I had to take my direction. – Ron Perlman
  9. I don't really know what is shocking. When you tell the story of a man who is beheaded, you have to show how they cut off his head. If you don't, it's like telling a dirty joke and leaving out the punch line. – Roman Polanski
  10. This show has shown me how to throw a punch But watching my future sister -in -law go through breast cancer has also shown me how to take one. – Charlotte Ross
  11. He punched me. If that's his best punch he'll be in trouble some day. – Patrick Roy
  12. Any time you think you have the game conquered, the game will turn around and punch you right in the nose. – Mike Schmidt
  13. Never go for the punch line. There might be something funnier on the way. – Jerry Stiller
  14. I think we're the only jokeless show on television. I mean really, we have no setups and no punch lines. It's not a joke show. There are funny lines and funny moments but again the comedy is born of the human experience and awkward pauses are a great part of what it is to be human. – Rainn Wilson

Usage examples for punch:

  1. The appearance of Jim Dawlish carrying a steaming bowl of punch seemed to Doris at length the signal for departure, and she rose from the table. ” – The Safety Curtain, and Other Stories by Ethel M. Dell
  2. You've a bruised spot over your left cheek bone that looks like the mark of a punch on the face. ” – The High School Boys' Fishing Trip by H. Irving Hancock
  3. If you call me Eely again, I'll punch your head. ” – Burr Junior by G. Manville Fenn
  4. That terrific punch and the iron- calm manner of the man who had dealt it had scared him. ” – The Snow-Burner by Henry Oyen
  5. The recent run at the Punch and Judy Theater in New York was upon a full size stage, and this was not at all an exception. ” – More Portmanteau Plays by Stuart Walker
  6. If you do fight Slater, Hardinge, I should certainly commence by giving the chaplain a punch in the eye. ” – Amusement Only by Richard Marsh
  7. The lady's maiden name was Ford; and the parson who sits next to the punch bowl in Hogarth's " Modern Midnight Conversation" was her brother's son. ” – Anecdotes of the late Samuel Johnson, LL.D. during the last twenty years of his life by Hesther Lynch Piozzi
  8. But, then, the captain did not drink Botallack punch while old Mr Donnithorne did, which may to some extent account for the difference in their powers of vision. ” – Deep Down, a Tale of the Cornish Mines by R.M. Ballantyne
  9. Felicity was as pleased as Punch – The Twelfth Hour by Ada Leverson
  10. “ I ought to punch your head." ” – Flowing Gold by Rex Beach
  11. Boss,- I helt out my hand- here's where you git a new son- in- law, and a foreman fer keeps on cow- punch pay. ” – Alec Lloyd, Cowpuncher by Eleanor Gates
  12. Things were against Punch – The History of "Punch" by M. H. Spielmann
  13. There was an excitement in this, but when the punch was gone I was very dull. ” – Autobiography of Anthony Trollope by Anthony Trollope
  14. As on the day before, Francis had cleared away the remains of the supper, and brought us our punch – Weird Tales. Vol. I by E. T. A. Hoffmann
  15. The children might have been drawn by Du Maurier in Punch long ago, to express a family who were overbred. ” – Man and Maid by Elinor Glyn
  16. Start out with a punch or you'll never get anywhere. ” – Paul and the Printing Press by Sara Ware Bassett
  17. He is fast for a man of his size and has a terrible right- hand punch – The Boy Allies at Jutland by Robert L. Drake
  18. With a shout of joy the company hurried him to the tavern, seated him before the fire, and put a glass of punch in his hand. ” – Tales Of Puritan Land Myths And Legends Of Our Own Land, Volume 4. by Charles M. Skinner
  19. They endeavored to gain his consent, and assured him that he should want for nothing, and his only work would be, to make punch and say prayers. ” – The Pirates Own Book by Charles Ellms
  20. But I might try to punch it out with your knife, if you put me on your shoulder. ” – Banked Fires by E. W. (Ethel Winifred) Savi

Rhymes for punch:


Idioms for punch:

  • pack a punch
  • a onetwo punch
  • punch sth into sth;
  • punch sm out;
  • punch sm in sth;
Alphabet: