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Usage examples for pronominal

  1. The explanatory parenthesis " she thought" comes between the pronominal subject and its verb might be interested. – Slips of Speech by John H. Bechtel
  2. If the noun is expressed, the word in question is called a pronominal adjective; but if the noun is omitted so that the word in question takes its place, it is called an adjective pronoun. – Composition-Rhetoric by Stratton D. Brooks
  3. The pronominal adjectives and the personal pronouns are especially likely to be used in such a way as to cause ambiguity. – Composition-Rhetoric by Stratton D. Brooks
  4. The partition of a singular object with a pronominal name is of rare occurrence in language. – The English Language by Robert Gordon Latham
  5. Either say, " One is a pronominal adjective, not compared," and give the three definitions accordingly; or else say, " One is a pronominal adjective, relating to person understood; of the third person, singular number, masculine gender, and objective case," and give the six definitions accordingly. – The Grammar of English Grammars by Goold Brown
  6. " Why, Colonel Keith, my dear," said good Mrs. Curtis, conceiving that her pronominal speech had " broken" her intelligence; " it seems we were mistaken in him all this time." – The Clever Woman of the Family by Charlotte M. Yonge
  7. Here, there, and where, joined with certain particles, have a relative and pronominal use. – A Grammar of the English Tongue by Samuel Johnson
  8. So far as I have been able to ascertain them the most important features characteristic of the Dakotan languages generally are the following: I. Three pronominal prefixes to verbs, i, o and wa. – The Dakotan Languages, and Their Relations to Other Languages by Andrew Woods Williamson
  9. From the Mikado himself- who still makes use of personal pronouns, or at least pronominal expressions, forbidden to any other mortal- down through all the grades of society, each class had an " I" peculiarly its own. – Japan: An Attempt at Interpretation by Lafcadio Hearn
  10. Here are a few other pronominal errors from leading authors: " Sir Thomas Moore in general so writes it, although not many others so late as him." – How to Speak and Write Correctly by Joseph Devlin
  11. An or a can only be joined with a singular: the correspondent plural is the noun without an article, as, I want a pen, I want pens; or with the pronominal adjective some, as, I want some pens. – A Grammar of the English Tongue by Samuel Johnson
  12. The " transitions," or the pronominal forms which indicate the passage of the action of a transitive verb from the agent to the object, play an important part in the Iroquois language. – The Iroquois Book of Rites by Horatio Hale
  13. Adelung and Latham do not however give pronominal forms in as many languages as they give words for father and mother, and I cannot so well determine their distribution. – The Dakotan Languages, and Their Relations to Other Languages by Andrew Woods Williamson
  14. In societies where subjection is extreme " there is an avoidance of the use of personal pronouns," though, as Herbert Spencer points out in illustrating this law, it is just among such societies that the most elaborate distinctions in pronominal forms of address are to be found. – Japan: An Attempt at Interpretation by Lafcadio Hearn
  15. Or those who will take the word simply as an adjective, may say, " Many is a pronominal adjective, of the positive degree, compared many, more, most, and relating to persons understood." – The Grammar of English Grammars by Goold Brown
  16. Own is a pronominal adjective, not compared. – The Grammar of English Grammars by Goold Brown
  17. His, its, whose, mine, and thine, are sometimes used as such substantives; but also are at other times pronominal possessive adjectives. – The Grammar of English Grammars by Goold Brown
  18. All Khasi nouns take a pronominal prefix to denote the gender, i. – The Khasis by P. R. T. Gurdon
  19. Pronominal adjectives have the nature both of the adjective and of the pronoun. – The Grammar of English Grammars by Goold Brown
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