premise

[p_ɹ_ˈɛ_m_ɪ_s], [pɹˈɛmɪs], [pɹˈɛmɪs]

Definitions of premise:

  1.   A statement accepted as true from which a conclusion is drawn. – The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  2.   A proposition laid down or proven, as a basis for argument. – The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  3.   To send or state before the rest: to make an introduction: to lay down propositions for subsequent reasonings. – The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  4.   A preposition antecedently assumed or laid down. – Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  5.   To speak or write as introductory to the main subject; to explain or offer previously; to lay down as first propositions on which the subsequent ones are based. – Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  6.   To make an explanation beforehand. – The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  7.   To state in advance, as an explanation. – The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  8.   To state, or lay down, first. – The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  9.   The two propositions of a syllogism, called respectively major and minor, from which the conclusion is deduced, subject- matter of a conveyance or deed as set forth in the beginning; a building and its adjuncts. – Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  10.   To state antecedent propositions. – Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  11.   To speak or write previously, or as introductory to the main subject; to lay down as propositions to reason from. – Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  12.   That which is premised: a proposition antecedently supposed or proved for after- reasoning: ( logic) one of the two propositions in a syllogism from which the conclusion is drawn: the thing set forth in the beginning of a deed:- pl. a building and its adjuncts. – The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.

Quotes for premise:

  1. Knowledge is power. Information is liberating. Education is the premise of progress, in every society, in every family. – Kofi Annan
  2. All of the factors that make up a quality city- safe streets, high paying jobs, strong neighborhoods, etc. - emanate from a strong educational premise – Alan Autry
  3. I am truly free only when all human beings, men and women, are equally free. The freedom of other men, far from negating or limiting my freedom, is, on the contrary, its necessary premise and confirmation. – Mikhail Bakunin
  4. Tonight, we gather to affirm the greatness of our nation- not because of the height of our skyscrapers, or the power of our military, or the size of our economy. Our pride is based on a very simple premise summed up in a declaration made over two hundred years ago. – Barack Obama
  5. The basic premise of this is that, yes, people have learned to clone each other, but that cloning is illegal. Not that it's bad, just that the law as it is now, is that if you die, you're dead. – Roger Spottiswoode

Usage examples for premise:

  1. This I thought fit to premise before the lives of Pelopidas and Marcellus, who were both great men, but who both fell by their own rashness. ” – Plutarch-Lives-of-the-noble-Grecians-and-Romans by Clough, Arthur Hugh
  2. The real nerve of the thinking of a mind so vehement, so passionate, so essentially dramatic is to be sought not in some principle which was the major premise of his syllogisms, but in some pervading emotion. ” – Shelley, Godwin and Their Circle by H. N. Brailsford
  3. It may take, for instance, as its major premise Love is the divine secret of blessedness. ” – The Five Great Philosophies of Life by William de Witt Hyde
  4. “ Edward clearly found himself able to accept only the premise – The Awkward Age by Henry James
  5. Here again Ogilvie has not so much a unity of structure in view as a unity of the passions, and it is this particular theme which generally guides his discourse; it is the general premise upon which his inquiry depends and on which his major justification of lyric poetry is based. ” – An Essay on the Lyric Poetry of the Ancients by John Ogilvie Commentator: Wallace Jackson
  6. The premise of the suffrage argument that the woman in industry needs the ballot in order to get fair treatment is the assumption that she now fails to get as fair treatment as is given the industrial man, and that this is due to the fact that she has no vote. ” –  by
  7. Granting this premise then what should follow next? ” – As It Was in the Beginning by Philip Verrill Mighels
  8. In such a case it is impossible to premise to what clouds of self- delusion an imaginative man will not rise. ” – Essays Æsthetical by George Calvert
  9. And indeed the elderly gentleman was a person of whom one might premise judging by his voice and appearance, that he would probably make himself at home anywhere. ” – Castle Richmond by Anthony Trollope
  10. “ I therefore premise that those who may be tempted to take up this publication, merely with a view of seeking aliment for their enmity, will, in more respects than one, probably find themselves disappointed. ” – Paris As It Was and As It Is by Francis W. Blagdon

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