prelude

[p_ɹ_ˈɛ_l_j_uː_d], [pɹˈɛljuːd], [pɹˈɛljuːd]

Definitions of prelude:

  1.   A short piece of music before a longer piece: a preface: a forerunner. – The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  2.   Prelusive. – The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  3.   Introductory piece of music; something that precedes. – The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  4.   Something introductory or preparatory, as indicative of what is to follow: a forerunner; a short strain of music before a regular piece or concert. – Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  5.   To precede; to introduce a piece of music with a voluntary movement; to serve as an introduction to. – Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  6.   To serve as an introduction to; precede. – The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  7.   A short piece of music played as an introduction to a longer piece; preface; something done to prepare the way for something more important. – The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  8.   To perform a prelude; preface. – The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  9.   To introduce; to play before. – Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  10.   A short musical flourish or voluntary played before the commencement of the piece to be performed; the overture; something introductory; something which indicates a future event. – Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  11.   To serve as an introduction. – Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  12.   To play before: to precede, as an introduction. – The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.

Quotes for prelude:

  1. So as a prelude whites must be made to realise that they are only human, not superior. Same with Blacks. They must be made to realise that they are also human, not inferior. – Steven Biko
  2. The world is likely to view any temporary extension of the income tax cuts for the top two percent as a prelude to a long -term or permanent extension, and that would hurt economic recovery as well by undermining confidence that we're prepared to make a commitment today to bring down our future deficits. – Timothy Geithner
  3. This kind of prelude was succeeded by the concerto itself which he executed with a degree of spirit and firmness that no one has ever pretended to equal. – John Hawkins
  4. I was fifteen years old, and I hardly knew how to play a simple Bach prelude on the piano when I began to compose music, and at the most advanced level. I had never studied such things as harmony. – Gyorgy Legeti
  5. Group conformity scares the pants off me because it's so often a prelude to cruelty towards anyone who doesn't want to- or can't- join the Big Parade. – Bette Midler

Usage examples for prelude:

  1. Agitated as Erika already was, and consequently sensitively alive to impressions, the first sound of the trumpets thrilled her every nerve, and before the last note of the prelude had died away she had reached a condition of ecstasy closely allied to pain, and could with difficulty restrain her tears. ” – Countess Erika's Apprenticeship by Ossip Schubin
  2. “ I'd rather dreaded the prelude – Black Oxen by Gertrude Franklin Horn Atherton
  3. But far different feelings must have been awakened, when he went on to unfold the gigantic scheme of conquest, to which, as he pretended, the invasion of Sicily was no more than a prelude – Stories From Thucydides by H. L. Havell
  4. It was the prelude however, to more serious attacks, which shortly succeeded one another in rapid succession till the moment of his death. ” – Pius IX. And His Time by The Rev. Æneas MacDonell Dawson
  5. He has begun a prelude to larger themes. ” – Reviews by Oscar Wilde
  6. But this served merely as a prelude to what was to follow. ” – Eugene Field, A Study In Heredity And Contradictions by Slason Thompson
  7. The great battle for human liberty had commenced; the struggle for religious liberty was but the prelude to what was to follow. ” – A Short History of France by Mary Platt Parmele
  8. That evening, during the half- hour preceding dinner, the dining- room was the scene of another struggle, only a little less desperate than that which had been the prelude to lunch, and again an appeal to the head of the house was found necessary. ” – Penrod and Sam by Booth Tarkington
  9. That former event served as a type and prelude to the latter, and formed moreover a prophecy of it in deeds, inasmuch as both rested on the same foundation, viz. ” – Christology of the Old Testament: And a Commentary on the Messianic Predictions, v. 1 by Ernst Wilhelm Hengstenberg
  10. The organ was playing the prelude when the little hand with the bow went out in a wide, sure, strong curve, and when the bow touched the strings, they sang from a soul depth that no child's experience could know. ” – In the Heart of a Fool by William Allen White

Idioms for prelude:

  • prelude to sth;
Alphabet: