[p_ˈɒ_m], [pˈɒm], [pˈɒm]

Definitions of Pomme:

  1.   In her., a device, or some part of it, resembling an apple.
  2.   Having the ends terminating in rounded protuberances or single balls; -- said of a cross.

Usage examples for Pomme:

  1. He had purchased the inn during the year '29, and since that time it had become the most popular in the city; and as a result of his enterprise, the Pomme de Pin, in the shadow of the one remaining city gate, Porte de la Grosse- Horloge, had lost the patronage of the nobility. ” – The Grey Cloak by Harold MacGrath
  2. The pomme de terre was tenderly cared for and grown as a great novelty and delicacy long before its introduction to general cultivation by Parmentier. ” – Castles and Chateaux of Old Touraine and the Loire Country by Francis Miltoun
  3. “ A large number, in spite of delicious flavor, are provokingly stony: such as the ripe guavas, the cherries, the barbadines; even the corrossole and pomme cannelle are little more than huge masses of very hard seeds buried in pulp of exquisite taste. ” – Two Years in the French West Indies by Lafcadio Hearn
  4. At the time I speak of David Lindsley had dwelt on the Pomme de Terre for five years. ” – Duffels by Edward Eggleston
  5. Here is a pomme cannelle: inside its scaly covering is the most delicious yellow custard conceivable, with little black seeds floating in it. ” – Two Years in the French West Indies by Lafcadio Hearn
  6. Instead, he lost heart, and, abandoning the strong lines of the Osage and the Pomme de Terre, fell back to Springfield, where comfortable quarters were built for his men, and he gathered in an abundance of supplies from the Union farmers of the surrounding country, expecting that he would be left undisturbed until Spring. ” – The Struggle for Missouri by John McElroy
  7. “ No, No, they have no Murphies there, for supper or for lunch, But you may get in course of time a pomme de terre to munch, With which, as you perforce must do as Calais folks are doing, You'll maybe have to gobble up the frog that went a wooing! ” – The Poetical Works of Thomas Hood by Thomas Hood
  8. “ Buffaloes they must be- elk or deer would look red- wolves red or white; and they could not be bears, as these last would not likely be out on the prairie in threes, unless, indeed, they might be grizzly bears- who do sometimes go out into the open ground to dig for the " pomme blanche" and other roots. ” – The Boy Hunters by Captain Mayne Reid
  9. Encore pomme du terre. ” – A Minstrel In France by Harry Lauder
  10. The Pomme d'Or, among others, is good and cheap; also Les Rochers de Calvados. ” – In the Day of Adversity by John Bloundelle-Burton