Pollen

[p_ˈɒ_l_ə_n], [pˈɒlən], [pˈɒlən]

Definitions of pollen:

  1.   The fertilizing powder contained in the anthers of flowers: fine flour.
  2.   The male fertilizing element of a flower, the microspores of a phanerogam.
  3.   a fine powder produced by the anthers of seed- bearing plants; fine grains contain male gametes
  4.   The fecundating dustlike cells of the anthers of flowers. See Flower, and Illust. of Filament.
  5.   A powder in the cells of the anthers of flowers necessary for producing more flowers.
  6.   The fecundating dust contained in the anther of flowers; fine bran.
  7.   Fecundating granules of plants.
  8.   The male fertilizing element of seed plants.
  9.   The fine powder formed within the anther of a flowering plant.
  10.   The fecundating powder or dust contained in the anthers of flowers, and afterwards dispersed on the stigma; the bloom of leaves.
  11.   the fine spores that contain male gametes and that are borne by an anther in a flowering plant
  12.   The male fertilizing element of flowering plants analogous to sperm in animals. It is released from the anthers as yellow dust, to be carried by insect or other vectors, including wind, to the ovary ( stigma) of other flowers to produce the embryo enclosed by the seed. The pollens of many plants are allergenic.
  13.   Fine bran or flour.

Quotes for pollen:

  1. Books are the bees which carry the quickening pollen from one to another mind. – James Russell Lowell

Usage examples for pollen:

  1. The ground may be rough and dirty, or full of rich flowers whose pollen stains, and of sweet substances that cling and become attachments- but overhead there is always the free sky. ” – Light On The Path and Through the Gates of Gold by Mabel Collins
  2. He was surrounded by wind- blown flower- pollen which seemed to him the yellow flames of separation. ” – Twenty-two Goblins by Unknown
  3. This generally throws enough pollen into the air so that an abundance of it reaches each receptive stigma. ” – Tomato Culture: A Practical Treatise on the Tomato by William Warner Tracy
  4. The wind carries this pollen – Ontario Teachers' Manuals: Nature Study by Ontario Ministry of Education
  5. Such failures, however, do not always come from a want of pollen but may result from an over or irregular supply of water either at the root or in the air, imperfectly balanced food supply, a sapping of the vitality of the plants when young, or from other causes. ” – Tomato Culture: A Practical Treatise on the Tomato by William Warner Tracy
  6. He knew that instant how the fertilising pollen of the West was needed here, and how the West needed the enfolding spiritual culture which is the breath within the breath of the East. ” – Son of Power by Will Levington Comfort and Zamin Ki Dost
  7. The little fellow is filled with wonderment as he learns how the clouds give up their drops of water to quench his thirst and how the sun smiles upon him to yellow his beard; and how the wonderful all- important pollen is developed and ripened. ” – The Mother and Her Child by William S. Sadler Lena K. Sadler
  8. About the fecundity of the pollen of flowers. ” – The Idol of Paris by Sarah Bernhardt
  9. “ For, you see- he paused- the girl who came West was Mrs. Pollen – The Best Short Stories of 1921 and the Yearbook of the American Short Story by Various
  10. There was a blight some years back and most of the male trees died off, except for a few on the other side of the planet- well out of bee- shot, even if the females there would let the females here have any pollen which they absolutely won't. ” – The Venus Trap by Evelyn E. Smith
  11. “ Darwin showed that the fertilising power of the pollen of another variety or of another individual is greater than that of the plant's own pollen – Darwin and Modern Science by A.C. Seward and Others
  12. Its pollen must reach its stigma- so he supposed- in order for the flower to become fruitful. ” – My Studio Neighbors by William Hamilton Gibson
  13. Heavy winds or wind- storms, and rains of several days duration, may prevent the necessary and desired distribution of the pollen as a result of which no fruit is formed. ” – The Pecan and its Culture by H. Harold Hume
  14. “ Kolreuter mentioned that pollen may be carried from one flower to another partly by wind and partly by insects. ” – Darwin and Modern Science by A.C. Seward and Others
  15. But just the same, the pollen that gave to her skin its velvetiness was there. ” – Star-Dust A Story of an American Girl by Fannie Hurst
  16. Either of the last two if left alone would be barren; the male flowers are always so, but the pistillate or female flowers, if fertilized with pollen from perfect- flowered plants, produce fruit. ” – Success With Small Fruits by E. P. Roe
  17. Madame de Rochefort- Mr. Burnaby- Mr. Pollen – The Best Short Stories of 1921 and the Yearbook of the American Short Story by Various
  18. Their filaments are so elastic that if touched before the flower has expanded, they suddenly spring from their in curved position, and scatter the pollen broadcast. ” – Herbal Simples Approved for Modern Uses of Cure by William Thomas Fernie

Rhymes for pollen:

  • nollan, olen, pollan, stalin;
  • bollen, collen, fallen, nolen;
  • carollan;
  • guatemalan;

Alphabet: