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Definitions of policy

  1. written contract or certificate of insurance; " you should have read the small print on your policy"
  2. a line of argument rationalizing the course of action of a government; " they debated the policy or impolicy of the proposed legislation"
  3. a plan of action adopted by an individual or social group; " it was a policy of retribution"; " a politician keeps changing his policies"
  4. One that covers a group or class of things or properties instead of one or more things mentioned individually, as where a mortgage secures various debts as a group, or subjects a group or class of different pieces of property to one general lien.
  5. Civil polity.
  6. The method by which any institution is administered; system of management; course.
  7. Management or administration based on temporal or material interest, rather than on principles of equity or honor; hence, worldly wisdom; dexterity of management; cunning; stratagem.
  8. Prudence or wisdom in the management of public and private affairs; wisdom; sagacity; wit.
  9. Motive; object; inducement.
  10. To regulate by laws; to reduce to order.
  11. A ticket or warrant for money in the public funds.
  12. The writing or instrument in which a contract of insurance is embodied; an instrument in writing containing the terms and conditions on which one party engages to indemnify another against loss arising from certain hazards, perils, or risks to which his person or property may be exposed. See Insurance.
  13. A method of gambling by betting as to what numbers will be drawn in a lottery; as, to play policy.
  14. A course or method of action selected, usually by a government, from among alternatives to guide and determine present and future decisions.
  15. The art or method of government; management of public affairs; course of conduct or action; action based on advantage rather than on right; prudence; cunning; a document containing a contract of insurance.
  16. The contract made by an insurance company with the insured to pay a definite amount of money in the case of a certain event- accident, sickness, death, or maturation of the policy- on condition that the insured pays to the company an agreed sum yearly or at other stated periods.
  17. The art or manner of governing a nation: a system of official administration: dexterity of management: prudence: cunning: in Scotland, the pleasure- grounds around a mansion.
  18. A warrant for money in the public funds: a writing containing a contract of insurance.
  19. Art or system of governing or conduct; prudence; a contract of insurance.
  20. Prudence; sagacity; finesse; artifice.
  21. A course or plan of action, as of a government.
  22. A written contract of insurance.
  23. In Scotland, pleasure- grounds round a mansion. See Police.
  24. Art or manner of governing a nation; the system of state administration; management adopted and pursued by a government; system of regulative measures; prudence, wisdom, cunning, or dexterity of management.
  25. A warrant for money in the public funds; a writing or instrument by which a contract or indemnity is effected.
  26. The art or manner of conducting public affairs professed by a party in the state; prudence or wisdom in rulers or individuals in the management of affairs; dexterity or art in management; in Scot., extensive pleasure grounds around a mansion- hose, originally the tract or district within which authority was exercised.
  27. A written contract by which a corporate body, or other persons, engage to pay a certain sum on certain contingencies, as in the vent of death or in the case of ifre, on the condition of receiving a fixed sum or percentage on the amount of the risk, or certain annual payments.
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Usage examples for policy

  1. That was this Nation's policy in the 1830's and that is this Nation's policy in the 1960's. – Complete State of the Union Addresses from 1790 to the Present by Various
  2. It wasn't a question of policy. – The Cattle-Baron's Daughter by Harold Bindloss
  3. " We are prepared to bear all the expense of publication and offer you a salary of one hundred dollars a month to conduct the paper; but of course we should expect to control the policy of it absolutely. – The Co-Citizens by Corra Harris
  4. We will not, as a matter of policy, show we are flattered. – Six One-Act Plays by Margaret Scott Oliver
  5. And Mr. Prendergast plainly showed by the tone of his voice that he did not admire the wisdom of this new policy of which he spoke. – Castle Richmond by Anthony Trollope
  6. This was good fortune, rather than the result of policy. – History-of-the-Conquest-of-Peru-with-a-preliminary-view-of-the-civilization-of-the-Incas by Prescott, William Hickling
  7. Many personal motives may have contributed to this, but on the whole there was sense and system in such a policy. – A History of England Principally in the Seventeenth Century, Volume I (of 6) by Leopold von Ranke
  8. " It is policy," whispered Commins. – The Golden Rock by Ernest Glanville
  9. How far this statement really expressed any policy I do not know. – Japan: An Attempt at Interpretation by Lafcadio Hearn
  10. Now, where is this policy? – The Best Policy by Elliott Flower
  11. And this policy will probably be largely extended after the war is over. – Modern American Prose Selections by Various
  12. So far as the great parties were concerned, it was impossible to fix upon either of them any general theory about slavery or any definite policy with it. – Stephen Arnold Douglas by William Garrott Brown
  13. This is a policy that has continued until this day. – The Romance of a Great Store by Edward Hungerford
  14. But was this to be the settled policy of the government? – The Facts of Reconstruction by John R. Lynch
  15. It is held, therefore, that no law is upon the Statute books by which the people may be permitted to vote even in an advisory capacity upon any question of police regulation or public policy. – Story of the Session of the California Legislature of 1909 by Franklin Hichborn
  16. It is interesting to note that Ottokar's policy brought him into a certain degree of contact with England. – From a Terrace in Prague by Lieut.-Col. B. Granville Baker
  17. And there is another very serious evil attached to the commercial policy of allowing our British agriculture to decay, and that is the evil of our dependence upon foreign countries for our food. – Britain for the British by Robert Blatchford
  18. We have too much policy in morals and religion. – Sages and Heroes of the American Revolution by L. Carroll Judson
  19. With the institution of this policy Zerubbabel may well have been quietly set aside. – The Makers and Teachers of Judaism by Charles Foster Kent
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