Dictionary.net

Definitions of page

  1. number the pages of a book or manuscript
  2. work as a page; " He is paging in Congress this summer"
  3. one side of one leaf ( of a book or magasine or newspaper or letter etc.) or the written or pictorial matter it contains
  4. in medieval times a youth acting as a knight's attendant as the first stage in training for knighthood
  5. a youthful attendant at official functions or ceremonies such as legislative functions and weddings
  6. a boy who is employed to run errands
  7. United States diplomat and writer about the Old South ( 1853- 1922)
  8. English industrialist who pioneered in the design and manufacture of aircraft ( 1885- 1962)
  9. call out somebody's name over a P. A. system
  10. Any one of several species of beautiful South American moths of the genus Urania.
  11. To attend ( one) as a page.
  12. One side of a leaf of a book or manuscript.
  13. Fig.: A record; a writing; as, the page of history.
  14. The type set up for printing a page.
  15. To mark or number the pages of, as a book or manuscript; to furnish with folios.
  16. A serving boy; formerly, a youth attending a person of high degree, especially at courts, as a position of honor and education; now commonly, in England, a youth employed for doing errands, waiting on the door, and similar service in households; in the United States, a boy employed to wait upon the members of a legislative body.
  17. A boy child.
  18. A contrivance, as a band, pin, snap, or the like, to hold the skirt of a woman's dress from the ground.
  19. A track along which pallets carrying newly molded bricks are conveyed to the hack.
  20. Formerly, a boy attending on a person of distinction; a serving boy in livery or uniform; a male attendant on a legislative, or lawmaking, body; one side of the leaf of a book; a record or writing; as, the page of history.
  21. To mark or number in pages.
  22. A boy attending on a person of distinction.
  23. One side of a leaf: ( orig.) a leaf of a book, so called because leaves were fastened together to form a book:- pl. writings.
  24. To number the pages of.
  25. A servant boy; one side of the leaf of a book.
  26. To number the pages of ( a book).
  27. A male attendant, usually a lad.
  28. One side of a leaf, as of a book.
  29. Books or writings.
  30. One side of a leaf of a book.
  31. To attend as a page.
  32. To mark or number the pages of.
  33. A boy who attends on a great person, but who is not a menial; a boy who attends on a person of rank or affluence, and who is a menial.
  34. One side of the leaf of a book.
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Usage examples for page

  1. Upon the blank page at the end I go on writing. – Hyperion by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow
  2. Herr Frank read the open page. – The Progressionists, and Angela. by Conrad von Bolanden
  3. Alexina, who had been reading in her bedroom, realized that it must be quite half an hour since she had turned a page. – The Sisters-In-Law by Gertrude Atherton
  4. 3. John says he-- understand the problem on page 266. 4. Why-- she come? – Practical Exercises in English by Huber Gray Buehler
  5. Then, he picked up the last page and looked at it again. – Indirection by Everett B. Cole
  6. A page lad came along with a telegram in his hand asking was there any gentleman there of the name of Moneylaws? – Dead Men's Money by J. S. Fletcher
  7. " This is good stuff," he said at the last page. – The Sport of the Gods by Paul Laurence Dunbar
  8. We read her letter without this page. – Cynthia Wakeham's Money by Anna Katharine Green
  9. Two dead- beats are better on a note than one on the books, but, better still, get the " order note" shown on another page of this book. – How to Collect a Doctor Bill by Frank P. Davis
  10. And that page, to which of them does he belong? – The Midnight Queen by May Agnes Fleming
  11. Which one of the two lines drawn on this page is longer? – A Practical Guide to Self-Hypnosis by Melvin Powers
  12. 1624. Page 187. Introduction to " Promus." – Bacon is Shake-Speare by Sir Edwin Durning-Lawrence
  13. There he had to sit, the door locked, under terror of stick, and study the page. – The Eulogy of Richard Jefferies by Walter Besant
  14. We had indeed stared at the page for a few minutes, and that could be called studying. – A Preface to Politics by Walter Lippmann
  15. He spoke quietly and kindly; and when he returned to me at the table and looked at the page on which I had been writing, he smiled. – The Legacy of Cain by Wilkie Collins
  16. He touched a bell and the page entered. – By Pike and Dyke: A Tale of the Rise of the Dutch Republic by G.A. Henty
  17. His step- son turned back the page, and looked at those words again. – Fated to Be Free by Jean Ingelow
  18. Old man, you said a page full! – His Unknown Wife by Louis Tracy
  19. That is, he makes a proof of each page. – The Blue Birds' Winter Nest by Lillian Elizabeth Roy
  20. " No, of course, not," Page admitted. – Dave Darrin's Fourth Year at Annapolis by H. Irving Hancock
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