observation

[ɒbzəvˈe͡ɪʃən], [ɒbzəvˈe‍ɪʃən], [ɒ_b_z_ə_v_ˈeɪ_ʃ_ə_n]

Antonyms for observation:

delinquency, unawareness, breach, challenge, Forgetting, overlooking, trespass, Flouting, infringement, transgression, offense, violation, rebellion, wrong, sin, Ignoring, obliviousness, defiance, contravention, infraction, disregard, nonobservance, dereliction, neglect, brush off.


Definitions of observation:

  1.   a remark expressing careful consideration – Wordnet Dictionary DB
  2.   facts learned by observing; " he reported his observations to the mayor" – Wordnet Dictionary DB
  3.   the act of making and recording a measurement – Wordnet Dictionary DB
  4.   Specifically, the act of measuring, with suitable instruments, some magnitude, as the time of an occultation, with a clock; the right ascension of a star, with a transit instrument and clock; the sun's altitude, or the distance of the moon from a star, with a sextant; the temperature, with a thermometer, etc. – Newage Dictionary DB
  5.   Hence: An expression of an opinion or judgment upon what one has observed; a remark. – Newage Dictionary DB
  6.   The act or habit of observing. – The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  7.   The act of noticing or remarking; the expression in words of what is observed or thought; comment or remark; in Scrip., outward show, as, " the kingdom of God cometh not with observation"; exhibition; in astron. and nav., the angular measurement of any space in the heavens; in science, the act of ascertaining temperature, or of noting or scrutinising some fact or occurrence in nature. – Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  8.   Act of observing: attention: as distinguished from experiment, the act of recognizing and noting phenomena as they occur in nature: that which is observed: a remark: performance. – The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  9.   the act of noticing or paying attention; " he escaped the notice of the police" – Wordnet Dictionary DB
  10.   The result of an act, or of acts, of observing; view; reflection; conclusion; judgment. – Newage Dictionary DB
  11.   The information so acquired. – Newage Dictionary DB
  12.   The act of recognizing and noting some fact or occurrence in nature, as an aurora, a corona, or the structure of an animal. – Newage Dictionary DB
  13.   Act of observing; attention; remark. – The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  14.   the act of observing; taking a patient look – Wordnet Dictionary DB
  15.   The act of regarding attentively and studying facts and occurrences, gathering data through analyzing, measuring, and drawing conclusions, with the purpose of applying the observed information to theoretical assumptions. Observation as a scientific method in the acquisition of knowledge began in classical antiquity; in modern science and medicine its greatest application is facilitated by modern technology. Observation is one of the components of the research process. – Medical Dictionary DB
  16.   Investigation. – Warner's pocket medical dictionary of today. By William R. Warner. Published 1898.
  17.   Performance of what is prescribed; adherence in practice; observance. – Newage Dictionary DB
  18.   an incidental remark – Wordnet Dictionary DB
  19.   The act, power, or habit of taking notice; that which is noticed or learned; fact of being seen; as, he did not escape observation; a remark. – The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  20.   The act or the faculty of observing or taking notice; the act of seeing, or of fixing the mind upon, anything. – Newage Dictionary DB
  21.   The act of observing or fixing the mind on anything; that which is observed; remark; observance; the angular measurement of any space on the celestial sphere. – Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.

Quotes for observation:

  1. Observation is a passive science, experimentation an active science. – Claude Bernard
  2. There's certainly nothing original about the observation that conscious experience poses a hard problem. – David Chalmers
  3. Our observation of nature must be diligent, our reflection profound, and our experiments exact. We rarely see these three means combined; and for this reason, creative geniuses are not common. – Denis Diderot
  4. But I make the observation that no one of us would do things exactly alike. – David Dinkins
  5. Even scientific knowledge, if there is anything to it, is not a random observation of random objects; for the critical objectivity of significant knowledge is attained as a practice only philosophically in inner action. – Karl Jaspers
  6. Laws and customs may be creative of vice; and should be therefore perpetually under process of observation and correction: but laws and customs cannot be creative of virtue: they may encourage and help to preserve it; but they cannot originate it. – Harriet Martineau
  7. The result was that, if it happened to clear off after a cloudy evening, I frequently arose from my bed at any hour of the night or morning and walked two miles to the observatory to make some observation included in the programme. – Simon Newcomb
  8. In the fields of observation chance favors only the prepared mind. – Louis Pasteur
  9. Children have very sharp powers of observation probably sharper than adults- yet at the same time their emotional reactions are murky and much more primitive. – Donna Tartt
  10. In dealing with the China problem, the British and American side, which had particularly strong interests in China, should have based its judgments about the origins of the problem on direct observation of the actual circumstances at the time. – Hideki Tojo
  11. It is now possible to quantify people's levels of happiness pretty accurately by asking them, by observation and by measuring electrical activity in the brain, in degrees from terrible pain to sublime joy. – Polly Toynbee
  12. It is of great importance to note these meteors, even the small ones, as very little is yet known of them; and every observation if carefully made, will some day help to show what they are. – William John Wills
  13. Surely it is time to examine into the meaning of words and the nature of things, and to arrive at simple facts, not received upon the dictum of learned authorities, but upon attentive personal observation of what is passing around us. – Francis Wright
  14. From the standpoint of observation then, we must regard it as a highly probable hypothesis that the beginnings of the mental life date from as far back as the beginnings of life at large. – Wilhelm Wundt

Usage examples for observation:

  1. With regard to this Hurliguerly made a sound observation – An Antarctic Mystery by Jules Verne
  2. At first it may appear that this is a matter for individual observation and judgment, and is not a proper subject for exact scientific experiments. ” – The Principles of Scientific Management by Frederick Winslow Taylor
  3. “ Guapo knew the reason well, and before leaving their place of observation the others had an explanation of it. ” – Popular Adventure Tales by Mayne Reid
  4. But there is one of these who comes so nearly, indeed so precisely, within this observation that it is impossible for me to pass him by. ” – The Works of the Right Honourable Edmund Burke, Vol. X. (of 12) by Edmund Burke
  5. His action was observed by a number of the Apaches, but none approached, nor did they pay the least attention to him; so he had every opportunity for a careful observation of what was going on around him. ” – Through Apache Lands by R. H. Jayne
  6. The boy was all questions and observation – Journal of an Expedition into the Interior of Tropical Australia In Search of a Route from Sydney to the Gulf of Carpentaria (1848) by Lt. Col. Sir Thomas Livingstone Mitchell Kt. D.C.L. (1792-1855) Surveyor-General of New South Wales by Thomas Mitchell
  7. They said little, it is true; even to one another, but more than once Mr. Bonamy chuckled in a particularly dry manner, and at the top of the street Jack made an observation You think the archdeacon was satisfied?" ” – The New Rector by Stanley J. Weyman
  8. Basil did not stop for any observation of that kind. ” – The Boy Hunters by Captain Mayne Reid
  9. An observation which is always true, must be expressed in the present tense. ” – The Grammar of English Grammars by Goold Brown
  10. Now and then Michael addressed some observation to her, but she answered him briefly and without interest. ” – Lover or Friend by Rosa Nouchette Carey
  11. His observation passed without a remark from us. ” – "And they thought we wouldn't fight" by Floyd Gibbons
  12. It was only one of our people, who had been over to the town, and had attracted her observation – Wives and Widows; or The Broken Life by Ann S. Stephens
  13. Each must seek, and find, and be convinced alone by personal experience and observation – Dawn by Mrs. Harriet A. Adams
  14. The second observation has to do with the telling of the story. ” – Principles of Teaching by Adam S. Bennion
  15. In the course of conversation, my having come from New York was the subject of an allusion; whereupon the dark woman slipped in the observation that she did wish she could get to that place, for she " was afraid that she should die, and have nothing to tell." ” – Papers from Overlook-House by Casper Almore
  16. One observation of his, I think it right to make known to you, which is, that he told me that since your supposed death, your father had never held up his head; indeed, he said that he had never seen him smile since." ” – Valerie by Frederick Marryat
  17. “ " You may not know," Graham said, " that ever since we found Howells, one of us has tried, more or less, to keep the entrance of that room under observation – The Abandoned Room by Wadsworth Camp
  18. In short, matters had reached a point which seemed fully to warrant an observation made about this time by Mr. Yorke to the tutor, Louis. ” – Shirley by Charlotte Brontë
  19. They should not be taken from observation – A Book of Ghosts by Sabine Baring-Gould
  20. “ A soft observation turneth away wrath. ” – The Story of a Doctor's Telephone--Told by His Wife by Ellen M. Firebaugh

Rhymes for observation:


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