Definitions of o'

  1. O, the fifteenth letter of the English alphabet, derives its form, value, and name from the Greek O, through the Latin. The letter came into the Greek from the Ph/ nician, which possibly derived it ultimately from the Egyptian. Etymologically, the letter o is most closely related to a, e, and u; as in E. bone, AS. ban; E. stone, AS. stan; E. broke, AS. brecan to break; E. bore, AS. beran to bear; E. dove, AS. d/ fe; E. toft, tuft; tone, tune; number, F. nombre.
  2. Among the ancients, O was a mark of triple time, from the notion that the ternary, or number 3, is the most perfect of numbers, and properly expressed by a circle, the most perfect figure.
  3. A prefix to Irish family names, which signifies grandson or descendant of, and is a character of dignity; as, O'Neil, O'Carrol.
  4. A shortened form of of or on.
  5. Among the ancients, was a mark of triple time, from the notion that the ternary, or number 3, is the most perfect of numbers, and properly expressed by a circle, the most perfect figure.
  6. An exclamation of wonder, pain, grief, etc.
  7. Expressing pain, wonder, desire, grief, & c.; also in calling or addressing.
  8. Fifteenth letter of the alphabet.
  9. a nonmetallic bivalent element that is normally a colorless odorless tasteless nonflammable diatomic gas; constitutes 21 percent of the atmosphere by volume; the most abundant element in the earth's crust
  10. The letter O, or its sound.
  11. Something shaped like the letter O; a circle or oval.
  12. The fifteenth letter in the English alphabet.
  13. An exclamation used in calling or directly addressing a person or personified object; also, as an emotional or impassioned exclamation expressing pain, grief, surprise, desire, fear, etc.
  14. An exclamation of wonder, pain, etc.; a call or term of address.
  15. An exclamation used in address.
  16. Same as OH.
  17. Is used in addressing a person, or a personified object, to express invoking or imploring, and always in addressing the Deity- thus distinguished from oh, which is employed to express an earnest wish, admiration or pity, warning, pain, sorrow, surprise, or dissent. Note.- It would be very useful and desirable were these distinctions observed, but our best writers use the two forms indiscriminately, o being the one now most generally employed; the point (!) Called the point of exclamation is often put after o and oh, but when rightly used the (!) Ought to be placed after the noun only- the o, in fact, only marking the vocative case, oh dear and oh dear me, exclamations expressive of surprise, uneasiness or exhaustion, fear, pain, and the like.
  18. One.
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