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Usage examples for magnitude

  1. Magnitude of the results achieved. – American Political Ideas Viewed From The Standpoint Of Universal History by John Fiske
  2. The account of the accident had been in that late edition of the penny paper which Isabelle had seen, but it had been crowded into the second page by the magnitude of the Atlantic and Pacific sensation. – Together by Robert Herrick (1868-1938)
  3. Thoroughly to appreciate all that they did requires that we travel over the wonderful trail they followed- that being impossible, the next nearest approach is to see actually drawn out the magnitude of their achievement. – Principles of Teaching by Adam S. Bennion
  4. That star of the second magnitude, Martin Van Buren, first among the sidera minora, had just risen. – Quodlibet by John P. Kennedy
  5. The appalling magnitude of the task never worried him- nor, for the matter of that, his fellow- workers. – Anthony Lyveden by Dornford Yates
  6. Very good; but you must remember that the general is a figure of the first magnitude in politics, and that his name would be sufficient to scare off all opposition. – Maximina by Armando Palacio Valdés
  7. His magnitude of glory and manly dignity as compared to his father's was about that of a tin pan to the sun. – The Bondboy by George W. (George Washington) Ogden
  8. I have neither the time nor the money to give to a work I never was fit for,- of whose magnitude even I was unable to conceive." – A Fearful Responsibility and Other Stories by William D. Howells
  9. In these cases, operations at the start may be of sufficient magnitude so that the output will amount to 15, 000 or 20, 000 ducklings in a year. – Ducks and Geese by Harry M. Lamon Rob R. Slocum
  10. The magnitude of the subject was indeed worthy of all the interest it excited. – The History of the Rise, Progress and Accomplishment of the Abolition of the African Slave-Trade, by the British Parliament (1839) by Thomas Clarkson
  11. If it were removed to the distance of an average first-, or second-, or third- magnitude star, how would its light compare with that of the stars? – A Text-Book of Astronomy by George C. Comstock
  12. Their apparent age runs up miraculously, like the value of diamonds, as they increase in magnitude. – The Complete PG Works of Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sr. by Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sr. (The Physician and Poet not the Jurist)
  13. Whilst we are discussing any given magnitude, they are grown to it. – Burke's Speech on Conciliation with America by Edmund Burke
  14. This private injury, however, is attended with a public benefit of the first magnitude; for every " House to be Let," holds forth a kind of invitation to the stranger to settle in it, who, being of the laborious class, promotes the manufactures. – An History of Birmingham (1783) by William Hutton
  15. On this occasion he declared that the magnitude of the subject and the immense importance of the interests concerned forbade him to anticipate the passing of any measure of general Church reform in the next Session. – Phineas Redux by Anthony Trollope
  16. After this conversation they separated; Appius not doubting but that his colleague, though he expressed himself so warmly, would, nevertheless, wait for a letter from Rome, in an affair of such magnitude. – The History of Rome; Books Nine to Twenty-Six by Titus Livius
  17. The visitor at Niagara, as he looks at the Falls, will have a profounder appreciation of their magnitude by considering that it requires the water drainage of a quarter of a continent to sustain them, and that the remoter springs, which send to them their constant tribute, are more than twelve hundred miles distant. – The Falls of Niagara and Other Famous Cataracts by George W. Holley
  18. Passing a screen of pines, we came out into a field containing thirteen acres of Wilson strawberries, and then more fully began to realize the magnitude of the business. – Success With Small Fruits by E. P. Roe
  19. 4: 19. 24. As to the magnitude of the sun, moon, and stars, it is an error to imagine that they are really no larger than they appear to us. – True Christianity by Johann Arndt
  20. A single room is that which has no parts and no magnitude. – Literary Lapses by Stephen Leacock
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