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Usage examples for LYNG

  1. That when one sees the Lyng ghost one never knows it. – The Early Short Fiction of Edith Wharton, Part 2 (of 10) by Edith Wharton
  2. All inquiries in the neighborhood failed to elicit the memory of a stranger's presence that day in the neighborhood of Lyng – The Early Short Fiction of Edith Wharton, Part 2 (of 10) by Edith Wharton
  3. The two brothers probably used this as their country house, for both of them had their chief occupation elsewhere; but when the bishop died, in 1288, and they became not quite the important people they had been before, they sold the Lyng House to another important person, of whom we shall hear more by- and- by. – The Coming of the Friars by Augustus Jessopp
  4. And this deepening apathy held her fast at Lyng in spite of the urgent entreaties of friends and the usual medical recommendation of " change." – The Early Short Fiction of Edith Wharton, Part 2 (of 10) by Edith Wharton
  5. The ghost- Alida's imperceptible ghost- after figuring largely in the banter of their first month or two at Lyng had been gradually discarded as too ineffectual for imaginative use. – The Early Short Fiction of Edith Wharton, Part 2 (of 10) by Edith Wharton
  6. It was called the Lyng House, and had been probably built two or three generations back, and now was occupied by a person of some consideration- viz. – The Coming of the Friars by Augustus Jessopp
  7. Lyng was not one of the garrulous old houses that betray the secrets intrusted to them. – The Early Short Fiction of Edith Wharton, Part 2 (of 10) by Edith Wharton
  8. The Lyng House, however, was not the great house of Rougham. – The Coming of the Friars by Augustus Jessopp
  9. But it turned out that in the event they were not destined to, for within three months of their conversation with Mrs. Stair they were established at Lyng and the life they had yearned for to the point of planning it out in all its daily details had actually begun for them. – The Early Short Fiction of Edith Wharton, Part 2 (of 10) by Edith Wharton
  10. The local fame of Lyng occasionally attracted the more intelligent sight- seer, and Mary half- expected to see the stranger dissemble a camera, or justify his presence by producing it. – The Early Short Fiction of Edith Wharton, Part 2 (of 10) by Edith Wharton
  11. Our friend at Rougham may have been, and probably was, some kinsman of the archdeacon, and it is just possible that Archdeacon Middleton, who, you remember, bought the Lyng House, may have had, as his predecessor in it, another archdeacon, this John de Ferentino, whose nephew or brother, James, married Miss Isabella de Rucham, and settled down among his wife's kindred. – The Coming of the Friars by Augustus Jessopp

Rhymes for LYNG