incumbent

[ɪnkˈʌmbənt], [ɪnkˈʌmbənt], [ɪ_n_k_ˈʌ_m_b_ə_n_t]

Definitions of incumbent:

  1.   One who holds an office. – The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  2.   One who holds a benefice or office. – The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  3.   The holder of an office; a clergyman in possession of a parish. – The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  4.   One who holds an ecclesiastical benefice. ( in England or Ireland). – The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  5.   Lying on; resting on, as a duty. – The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  6.   Lying or resting on, as a duty or obligation; indispensable; in bot, applied to cotyledons with the radicle on their back. – Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  7.   Lying or resting on; lying on, as a duty; said of the anthers of plants, when so disposed as to lie one over the other; said of the wings of insects, when one laps over the other. – Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  8.   Lying upon; bent downwards to lie along a base; cotyledons with hypocotyl applied to the back; hairs or spines applied lengthwise to their base. – A dictionary of scientific terms. By Henderson, I. F.; Henderson, W. D. Published 1920.
  9.   The person in present possession of a benefice or of an office. – Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  10.   The person who is in the possession of an office, as of an ecclesiastical benefice. – Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  11.   Lying upon; imposed as a duty; obligatory. – The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  12.   INCUMBENTLY. – The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  13.   Lying or resting on: lying on as a duty: indispensable. – The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.

Quotes for incumbent:

  1. I believe it is incumbent upon Congress to act aggressively to ameliorate fear and help our country take the essential steps that will make our communities and lives safer. – Paul Gillmor
  2. It is incumbent upon us to understand our greatness and believe in it so that we do not cheapen and profane ourselves. – Meir Kahane
  3. It is incumbent on us to facilitate the development of a market structure that best assures that these changes benefit the U. S. securities markets as a whole. – Arthur Levitt
  4. The police are the public and the public are the police; the police being only members of the public who are paid to give full time attention to duties which are incumbent on every citizen in the interests of community welfare and existence. – Robert Peel
  5. The first tenet is that you should report corruption regardless of loyalty to incumbent or party. – Linda Tripp

Usage examples for incumbent:

  1. Was it not incumbent on him to make her understand why he threw from him such golden hopes? ” – The Bertrams by Anthony Trollope
  2. Nevertheless it is incumbent upon me, as your nearest blood relative, to see after you, now that you are alone again, and to take care, as far as I can, that you do not lapse lower. ” – East Lynne by Mrs. Henry Wood
  3. One day, he was passing a church that had hitherto been always closed, its incumbent being one of those who had fled at the outbreak of the Plague. ” – When London Burned by G. A. Henty
  4. The mode of communication I must leave to your discretion; and shall only add that, although from a combination of circumstances, ill- nature, and mistaken friendship, the sentence is in itself terrible, yet it is incumbent on me to assure you that, from the same combination of circumstances, everybody who attended the trial is perfectly satisfied in his own mind that he was hardly guilty in appearance, in intention he was perfectly innocent. ” – The Eventful History Of The Mutiny And Piratical Seizure Of H.M.S. Bounty: Its Cause And Consequences by Sir John Barrow
  5. It wasn't the first time that he had lost the front- porch privilege, and in the past he had won it back again by keeping under cover and giving the incumbent a chance to become tiresome. ” – Fore! by Charles Emmett Van Loan
  6. Defense and protection of wife, children, and all within his household are incumbent on any one worthy to be called a man. ” – Witchcraft of New England Explained by Modern Spiritualism by Allen Putnam
  7. It is incumbent on an actor, as is well known, and on a public speaker, to a less extent, to make a careful study of gesture- a study which must principally consist in the observation and imitation of others, for the matter cannot very well be based on abstract rules; with the exception of some quite general leading principles- as, for instance, that the gesture must not follow the word, but rather immediately precede it, in order to announce it and thereby rouse attention. ” – Essays of Schopenhauer by Arthur Schopenhauer
  8. What is incumbent on the assertors of the Fourth Week of October system to prove is not whether their then expected Constitution was likely to be stable or transitory, but whether it promised to this country and its allies, and to the peace and settlement of all Europe, more good- will or more good faith than any of the experiments which have gone before it. ” – The Works of the Right Honourable Edmund Burke, Vol. VI. (of 12) by Edmund Burke
  9. Was it absolutely incumbent on him to refer again to the incidents of last night? ” – Can You Forgive Her? by Anthony Trollope
  10. But grant that the sort of recognition we gave of the right of the citizen to be guaranteed a subsistence was a mockery more brutal than its total denial would have been, and that a far larger interpretation of its duty in this respect was incumbent on the state, yet how does it logically follow that society is bound to guarantee or the citizen to demand an absolute economic equality? ” – Equality by Edward Bellamy

Idioms for incumbent:

  • incumbent ( upon sm) to do ( sth);
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