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Usage examples for Holde

  1. Slosson my supporte, As once y was his soul's delite- Holde hym not ever in yr. – Eugene Field, A Study In Heredity And Contradictions by Slason Thompson
  2. And with how ripe a wisdom, combined with ethics of true gentleness, the honest " Franklin," at the opening of his " Tale," discourses on the uses and the beauty of long- suffering:- For one thing, sires, safely dare I say, That friends the one the other must obey, If they will longe holde company. – Chaucer by Adolphus William Ward
  3. An other thing the antiquetie did upon good consideration, that of the wages, whiche they gave to every souldiour, the thirde parte they woulde shoulde be laied up nexte to him, whome carried the ansigne of their bande, whiche never gave it them againe, before the warre was ended: this thei did, beyng moved of twoo reasons, the first was to thintente, that the souldiour should thrive by his wages, because the greatest parte of them beyng yonge men, and carelesse, the more thei have, so muche the more without neede thei spende, the other cause was, for that knowyng, that their movabelles were nexte to the ansigne, thei should be constrained to have more care thereof, and with more obstinatenesse to defende it: and this made them stronge and to holde together: all which thynges is necessarie to observe, purposinge to reduce the exercise of armes unto the intier perfection therof. – Machiavelli, Volume I The Art of War; and The Prince by Niccolò Machiavelli
  4. The Neighbourhoode is too hot to holde them; olde Friends cowardlie and suspicious, olde and new Foes in League together. – Mary Powell & Deborah's Diary by Anne Manning
  5. Sende then to hir, and let some meane be vs'd With some deuise so holde hir still aliue, Some faire large promises: and let them marke Whither they may by some fine conning slight Enter the tombes. – A Discourse of Life and Death, by Mornay; and Antonius by Garnier by Philippe de Mornay Robert Garnier
  6. This purpos wol I holde and this is beste. – Chaucer and His Times by Grace E. Hadow
  7. There have Laurence, many helde, and do holde this opinion, that there is no maner of thing, whiche lesse agreeth the one with the other, nor that is so much unlike, as the civil life to the Souldiours. – Machiavelli, Volume I The Art of War; and The Prince by Niccolò Machiavelli
  8. 20 Du erheiterst, holde Freude! – An anthology of German literature by Calvin Thomas
  9. They called such linking verse Epimone, the Latines versus intercalaris, and we may terme him the Loue- burden, following the originall, or if it please you, the long repeate: in one respect because that one verse alone beareth the whole burden of the song according to the originall: in another respect, for that it comes by large distances to be often repeated, as in this ditty made by the noble knight Sir Philip Sidney, My true loue hath my heart and I haue his, By iust exchange one for another geuen: I holde his deare, and mine he cannot misse, There neuer was a better bargaine driuen. – The Arte of English Poesie by George Puttenham
  10. Sir John Hawkins says of its use in Florida:- " The Floridians, when they travel, have a kind of herb dried, which with a cane and an earthen cup in the end, with fire and the dried herbs put together, do suke through the cane the smoke thereof, which smoke satisfieth their hunger, and therewith they live four or five dayes without meat or drinke, and this all the Frenchmen used for this purpose: yet do they holde opinion withall, that it causeth water and steame to void from their stomacks." – Tobacco; Its History, Varieties, Culture, Manufacture and Commerce by E. R. Billings
  11. My Sisters, holde me vp. – A Discourse of Life and Death, by Mornay; and Antonius by Garnier by Philippe de Mornay Robert Garnier
  12. Wherfore we ought as borrow'd things receiue The goods light she lends vs to pay againe: Not holde them sure, nor on them builde our hopes As one such goods as cannot faile, and fall: But thinke againe, nothing is dureable, Vertue except, our neuer failing hoste: So bearing saile when fauouring windes do blowe, As frowning Tempests may vs least dismaie When they on vs do fall: not ouer- glad With good estate, nor ouer- grieu'd with bad. – A Discourse of Life and Death, by Mornay; and Antonius by Garnier by Philippe de Mornay Robert Garnier
  13. And that likewise for euer they haue the libertie aforesayde: that is to say: That wee and our heires haue not the worships or mariages of their heires by reason of their landes which they holde within the liberties and Portes aforesayd, for the which their seruice aforesaid, and for which wee and our predecessors the wardships and mariages haue not had in times past, But our aforesayd confirmation of their liberties and freedomes aforesaid and other grants following to them of our especiall grace of new we haue caused to bee made. – The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques and Discoveries of the English Nation, v. 1, Northern Europe by Richard Hakluyt
  14. For we holde it to be part of an honest and ingenuous mind, as to refute false crimes, so not to challenge vndeserued praise vnto himselfe, nor to accept it being offered. – The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques and Discoveries of the English Nation, v. 1, Northern Europe by Richard Hakluyt