gauge

[ɡ_ˈeɪ_dʒ], [ɡˈe͡ɪd͡ʒ], [ɡˈe‍ɪd‍ʒ]

Definitions of gauge:

  1.   To measure or to ascertain the contents of; to ascertain the capacity of, as a pipe, puncheon, hogshead, barrel, tierce, keg, etc.: to measure in respect to proportion, capability, or power, or in respect to character or behavior; to take cognizance of the capacity, capability, or power of; to appraise; to estimate; as, I gauged his character very accurately. " The vanes nicely gauged on each said."- Derham. – The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  2.   A measure; a standard of measure; on a railway, the distance between the rails, usually 4 feet 8 1/ 2 inches; a workman's tool; a mixture of certain stuff and plaster, used in finishing the best ceilings, and for mouldings. – Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  3.   A measure; a standard of measure; the number of feet which a ship sinks in the water; the position of one vessel with respect to another, the weather- gauge being to weatherward, and the lee- gauge to leeward; a piece of hard wood variously notched, used to adjust the dimensions, slopes, & c., of the various sorts of letters; an instrument made to strike a line parallel to the straight side of a board; the distance between the rails, the broad gauge being 7 ft. and the narrow gauge 4 ft. 8 1/ 2 in. Sliding gauge, a tool used by mathematical instrument makers for measuring and setting off distances. Rain- gauge, an instrument for measuring the quantity of rain which falls at any given place. Sea- gauge, an instrument for finding the depth of the sea. Syphon- gauge, a gauge made in the form of a syphon, such as the steam- gauge, condenser- gauge, & c. Tide- gauge, an instrument for determining the height of the tides. Wind- gauge, an instrument for measuring the force of the wind on any given surface. Gauges, brass rings with handles, to find the diameter of all kinds of shot with expedition. – Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  4.   To measure or ascertain the contents of a cask or vessel; to measure or ascertain, as the quantity, diameter, & c. – Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  5.   To measure the contents of, as a vessel. – The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  6.   A measure. – The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  7.   To ascertain the capacity or the contents of; to measure in respect to capability; to estimate. – Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  8.   To measure. Also, gage. – The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  9.   A standard of measure; an instrument to determine the dimensions or capacity of anything; a standard of any kind; a measure; means of estimating; " Timothy proposed to his mistress that she should entertain no servant that was above four foot seven inches high, and for that purpose had prepared a gauge, by which they were to be measured."- Arbuthnot: specifically, the distance between the rails of a railway; also, the distance between the opposite wheels of a carriage: naut ( a) the depth to which a vessel sinks in the water; ( b) the position of a ship with reference to another vessel and to the wind; when to the windward, she is said to have the weather- gauge, when to the leeward, the lee- gauge: in build, the length of a slate or tile below the lap: in plastering, ( a) the quantity of plaster of Paris used with common plaster to accelerate its setting; ( b) the composition of plaster of Paris and other materials, used in finishing plastered ceilings, for mouldings, etc.: in type- founding, a piece of hard wood variously notched, used to adjust the dimensions, slopes, etc., of the various sorts of letters: in joinery, a simple instrument made to strike a line parallel to the straight side of a board, etc.: in the air- pump, an instrument of various forms, which points out the degree of exhaustion in the receiver; the siphon- gauge is most generally used for this purpose. – The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  10.   A standard of measure; measuring- rod. – The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.

Quotes for gauge:

  1. It's difficult to gauge that. With a bad guy you just know you're bad. To play a nice guy is harder- unless you are a very nice person like me of course. – James D'arcy
  2. The degree of freedom from unwanted thoughts and the degree of concentration on a single thought are the measures to gauge spiritual progress. – Ramana Maharshi
  3. I am 58 and it's difficult for people to gauge my age. – Richard O'Brien
  4. Well, gauge theory is very fundamental to our understanding of physical forces these days. But they are also dependent on a mathematical idea, which has been around for longer than gauge theory has. – Roger Penrose
  5. I try to gauge whether a girl likes me before I make a move. I would write a page -long note to a girl. If she wrote a whole page back, I knew she liked me, too. If she wrote back like two words, then I figured I'd move on. – Devon Werkheiser

Usage examples for gauge:

  1. “ I felt that he was a difficult man to gauge because he had never been what I considered a sportsman. ” – Godfrey Marten, Undergraduate by Charles Turley
  2. “ I suppose a narrow- gauge road can go anywhere. ” – Over the Rocky Mountains to Alaska by Charles Warren Stoddard
  3. My dear daughter, he said, I invariably gauge the length of my speech by the importance of the occasion. ” – The Flag by Homer Greene
  4. See, he turned the light on to the wind- gauge it showed a pressure of sixty miles an hour, it is a wonder to me she has not been torn apart, he declared. ” – The Boy Aviators' Treasure Quest by Captain Wilbur Lawton (pseudonym for John Henry Goldfrap)
  5. The Railway Gauge Commission in this year was an important employment. ” – Autobiography of Sir George Biddell Airy by George Biddell Airy
  6. She looked at him, trying to gauge his sincerity. ” – Syndrome by Thomas Hoover
  7. He looked down at her with an expression she could not gauge – Gone to Earth by Mary Webb
  8. The instrument he developed in consequence became the standard steam pressure gauge – The Introduction of Self-Registering Meteorological Instruments by Robert P. Multhauf
  9. “ Adrian my brother- in- law- for if I gauge that fine creature properly- splendid old lady- she won't let him slide back this time. ” – The Light of Scarthey by Egerton Castle
  10. You needn't hurry, said her father; the narrow- gauge train doesn't leave for half an hour. ” – A Romance in Transit by Francis Lynde

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