Dictionary.net

Definitions of furniture

  1. furnishings that make a room or other area ready for occupancy; " they had too much furniture for the small apartment"; " there was only one piece of furniture in the room"
  2. That with which anything is furnished or supplied; supplies; outfit; equipment.
  3. Articles used for convenience or decoration in a house or apartment, as tables, chairs, bedsteads, sofas, carpets, curtains, pictures, vases, etc.
  4. The necessary appendages to anything, as to a machine, a carriage, a ship, etc.
  5. The masts and rigging of a ship.
  6. The mountings of a gun.
  7. Builders' hardware such as locks, door and window trimmings.
  8. Pieces of wood or metal of a lesser height than the type, placed around the pages or other matter in a form, and, with the quoins, serving to secure the form in its place in the chase.
  9. A mixed or compound stop in an organ; - sometimes called mixture.
  10. The planning of the furnishings and decorations of an architectural interior.
  11. The necessary fittings of a house, a ship, or a trade; outfit.
  12. Movables, either for use or ornament, with which a house is equipped: equipage: decorations.
  13. Movable goods; appliances.
  14. Outfit, as of chairs, tables, etc.; the trappings of a horse or the like.
  15. Articles necessary or convenient for housekeeping; whatever is added to the interior of a house or apartment for use or convenience; equipage; decorations; the implements of an art; the material, of either wood or metal, which keeps the pages bound fast together, and likewise separates them so as to allow a uniform margin, at the head and sides of each page, when the printed sheet is folded; the brasswork of locks, windows, knobs of doors, shutters, & c., of a house.
  16. The necessary movables of a house; equipage; decoration.
Loading...

Usage examples for furniture

  1. " She can't miss her father as I should miss you, for he is so absent- minded that he really doesn't know her from the furniture – The Wide Awake Girls in Winsted by Katharine Ellis Barrett
  2. The room was all dressed in white,- white window curtains, white bed curtains, white furniture and white walls, with just a few lines of pink here and there. – Journeys Through Bookland V2 by Charles H. Sylvester
  3. It is quite handsome, and has been for a long time the favorite wood for cabinet and furniture making. – Seasoning of Wood by Joseph B. Wagner
  4. Somebody's furniture is packed inside that wagon. – Black-Eyed Susan by Ethel Calvert Phillips
  5. Whatever she will give thee, money, or furniture or clothes, receive it promptly and with gratitude; but let thy home be thy own. – Jane Talbot by Charles Brockden Brown
  6. Do you know why there's no furniture in the rooms? – Masterman and Son by W. J. Dawson
  7. It is not from fine furniture that our true pleasure in life is to come, but from a consciousness of right- doing. – After a Shadow, and Other Stories by T. S. Arthur
  8. There was no other furniture – My Attainment of the Pole by Frederick A. Cook
  9. When Gouron asked what was to become of his property, furniture etc. – The Project Gutenberg Memoirs of Napoleon Bonaparte by Bourrienne, Constant, and Stewarton
  10. This was her own furniture for her new home. – The Amazing Interlude by Mary Roberts Rinehart
  11. The key for a moment, the key, my darling, of this fine old piece of furniture – Springhaven A Tale of the Great War by R. D. Blackmore
  12. You will remember, also, the mysterious way in which that furniture vanished from the scene of your adventure. – The Mystery of the Four Fingers by Fred M. White
  13. Women could own land, houses, and furniture and other property. – Our Legal Heritage, 4th Ed. by S. A. Reilly
  14. I want that furniture very much; but- I know there are things money can't buy. – An Alabaster Box by Mary E. Wilkins Freeman and Florence Morse Kingsley
  15. Of furniture besides Jack's chair, there was only what they had found in the shack, a rough, home- made bed and a table. – The Huntress by Hulbert Footner
  16. I've almost forgotten what the furniture is covered with. – Gypsy's Cousin Joy by Elizabeth Stuart Phelps
  17. Every piece of furniture here is of the old- time type. – Historic Homes by Mary H. Northend
  18. But when they come home from India for always, papa and mamma are going to get a pretty house, and choose all the furniture like here, you know, only not so pretty, I daresay, for a house like this would cost such a great deal of money. – Rosy by Mrs. Molesworth
  19. I have only to tell him, and he will put me among my own furniture at once. – The Pretty Lady by Arnold E. Bennett
  20. All this furniture had come from Germany, and must have cost a pretty penny. – Good Old Anna by Marie Belloc Lowndes
X