fillet

[f_ˈɪ_l_ɪ_t], [fˈɪlɪt], [fˈɪlɪt]

Definitions of fillet:

  1.   Band of white matter in the brain; the lemniscus of the mid- brain. – A dictionary of scientific terms. By Henderson, I. F.; Henderson, W. D. Published 1920.
  2.   To bind with a narrow band; ornament with a rim or molding; make into fillets, as veal, etc. – The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  3.   A little band to tie about the hair of the head; meat rolled together and tied round; any small scantling less than a batten; a kind of orle or bordure; a little rule or reglet of leaf- gold; the loins of a horse. – Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  4.   A band; piece of meat from the thigh. – The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  5.   A boneless lump of flesh bound together by a fillet or bandage; the fleshy part of the thigh in veal. – Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  6.   A narrow band of metal, linen, silk, etc., worn around the forehead, for holding the hair; the fleshy part of the thigh; said of meat; a boneless lump of meat of fish served flat or rolled together and tied; a raised rim, narrow ornament, or molding. – The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  7.   To bind with a little band; in arch., to adorn with a band or astragal. – Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  8.   A little band, such as may be put round the head; a narrow ornament or moulding. – Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  9.   To bind, furnish, or adorn with a fillet or little band. " He made hooks for the pillars, and overlaid their chapiters, and filleted them."- Ex. xxxvii. 28. – The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  10.   To bind or adorn with a fillet or little band. A fillet of veal, the fleshy part of the thigh. See File. – Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  11.   A little band to tie about the hair of the head; a muscle, or a piece of meat composed of muscles; especially, the fleshy part of the thigh applied chiefly to veal; as, a fillet of veal; meat rolled together and tied round; in arch. ( a) a small moulding generally rectangular in section, and having the appearance of a narrow band, generally used to separate ornaments and mouldings; an annulet; a list; a listel; ( b) the ridge between the flutes of a column- called also a FACET or FACETTE; in the manege, the loins of a horse, beginning at the place where the hinder part of the saddle rests; in technology, in general, this word has a great many applications, such as in carp, a strip nailed to a wall or partition to support a shelf, a strip for a door to close against; in gilding, a band of gold- leaf on a picture- frame or elsewhere; in coining, a strip of metal rolled to a certain size; also the thread of a screw; a ring on the muzzle of a gun, etc. – The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.

Quotes for fillet:

  1. Even if I set out to make a film about a fillet of sole, it would be about me. – Federico Fellini

Usage examples for fillet:

  1. Their headdress is a round fillet adorned with feathers, and a straw bonnet something like a Scotch one; the former, I believe, being chiefly worn by the men, and the latter by the women. ” – A Voyage Towards the South Pole and Round the World, Volume 1 by James Cook
  2. The figure on the left wears a fillet indicating priesthood. ” – Walks in Rome by Augustus J.C. Hare
  3. “ Cora, radiant- eyed, in high bloom, and exquisite from head to foot in a shimmering white dancing- dress, a glittering crescent fastening the silver fillet that bound her vivid hair, was a flame of enchantment. ” – The Flirt by Booth Tarkington
  4. The Somali matron is distinguished- externally- from the maiden by a fillet of blue network or indigo- dyed cotton, which, covering the head and containing the hair, hangs down to the neck. ” – First Footsteps in East Africa or, an Exploration of Harar by Richard F. Burton
  5. The long tresses of his sunny hair were bound by a simple fillet and in them was twined the Flamingo Feather that proclaimed his rank. ” – The Flamingo Feather by Kirk Munroe
  6. On my last call upon Frieda at her studio I had seen him in the lighter garb of Orion, with a gold fillet about his brow, surmounted by a gilt star. ” – A Top-Floor Idyl by George van Schaick
  7. She left the room, and in a quarter of an hour returned, bringing in her hand a small brazier of lighted charcoal, and two small pieces of parchment, rolled up and fixed by a knot to the centre of a narrow fillet – The Phantom Ship by Captain Frederick Marryat
  8. Yet life is sweet and death is bitter, and it is hard to go; and as he tosses to and fro in his fever there comes in to him an old friend, the headman of the village perhaps, with a white muslin fillet bound about his kind old head, and he sits beside the dying man and speaks to him. ” – The Soul of a People by H. Fielding
  9. “ " With what a classic grace the fillet passing round the majestic forehead, confines his flowing locks, which mingle with his beard! ” – Hyperion by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow
  10. In the open market you can get fillet of beef for 1 mark 60 pf. ” – Home Life in Germany by Mrs. Alfred Sidgwick

Rhymes for fillet:


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