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Definitions of fahrenheit

  1. of a temperature scale that registers the freezing point of water as 32 degrees F and the boiling point as 212 degrees F at one atmosphere of pressure; " the Fahrenheit scale"
  2. German physicist who invented the mercury thermometer and developed the scale of temperature that bears his name ( 1686- 1736)
  3. Conforming to the scale used by Gabriel Daniel Fahrenheit in the graduation of his thermometer; of or relating to Fahrenheit's thermometric scale.
  4. Conforming to the scale used by Gabriel Daniel in the graduation of his thermometer; of or relating to Fahrenheit's thermometric scale.
  5. The termometer or scale.
  6. The name of a thermometer scale having 32 degrees as its freezing point, and 212 degrees as the boiling point of water.
  7. The name distinguishing the kind of thermometer in most common use in England and America, in which the space between the freezing and the boiling points of water, under a medium pressure of the atmosphere, is divided into 180°; the freezing point being marked 32°, and the boiling 212°; as, there was a temperature of 60° Fahrenheit, that is, by a Fahrenheit thermometer; the Fahrenheit scale.
  8. Designating that thermometer - scale in which the freezing point of water is 32° and the boiling - point 212°; named from Fahrenheit, German physicist ( 1686 - 1736).
  9. A thermometer which fixes the freezing- point at 32 and the boiling at 212, so named from the inventor.
  10. The name given to a thermometer in which the freezing- point of water is marked 32°, and the boiling- point 212°.

Usage examples for fahrenheit

  1. The milk and water should be of the same temperature as the mother's milk, that is to say, at about ninety degrees Fahrenheit. – Advice to a Mother on the Management of her Children by Pye Henry Chavasse
  2. Now, while they are talking about America and their own local atmosphere and temperature, there comes in a second Boston Fahrenheit. – The Complete PG Works of Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sr. by Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sr. (The Physician and Poet not the Jurist)
  3. Mercurial pyrometers for temperatures up to 1000 degrees Fahrenheit. – Steam, Its Generation and Use by Babcock & Wilcox Co.
  4. The temperature of the water is 130 degrees Fahrenheit and too hot to drink but, if sipped slowly, it makes an admirable hot- water draught. – Arizona Sketches by Joseph A. Munk
  5. A nursery is usually kept too hot; the temperature in the winter time ought not to exceed 60 degrees Fahrenheit A good thermometer should be considered an indispensable requisite to a nursery. – Advice to a Mother on the Management of her Children by Pye Henry Chavasse
  6. For in England, you know, they consider fifty- eight Fahrenheit quite warm enough for their drawing- rooms, while here in Italy- well, one never is so cold, I think, as in a warm climate. – The Front Yard by Constance Fenimore Woolson
  7. In 1838, at Cambridge, Massachusetts, and New- Haven, Connecticut, at seventy degrees, Fahrenheit, the air held eighty per cent of moisture. – The American Woman's Home by Catherine E. Beecher and Harriet Beecher Stowe
  8. In the stokehold the thermometer registered 130 degrees Fahrenheit, and the white and brown torsos that strained under the trembling dials were black with the sooty sweat of their effort and red with the pitiless glare from the grates. – The Portal of Dreams by Charles Neville Buck
  9. The Fahrenheit, which has got warmed up to temperate, rises to summer heat, and even a little above it. – The Complete PG Works of Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sr. by Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sr. (The Physician and Poet not the Jurist)
  10. 35. Water freezes at thirty- two degrees Fahrenheit. – Practical Grammar and Composition by Thomas Wood
  11. That the king of Kandy did not reside at Newera Ellia there is little wonder, as a monarch delighting in a temperature of 85 Fahrenheit would have regarded the climate of a mean temperature of 60 Fahrenheit as we should that of Nova Zembla. – Eight Years' Wandering in Ceylon by Samuel White Baker
  12. In the depth of winter it falls from 30 to 40, 45, and even 50 degrees below zero of Fahrenheit. – Hudson Bay by R.M. Ballantyne
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