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Usage examples for enact

  1. I shall do my best to enact the little Puritan. – Cruel As The Grave by Mrs. Emma D. E. N. Southworth
  2. When it was settled in this, that whatever the cardinal and the English prelates should enact with the King's consent should have the force of law, does not this imply at least a temporary schism? – A History of England Principally in the Seventeenth Century, Volume I (of 6) by Leopold von Ranke
  3. The colonists were to form an English parliament to enact English law. – Irish Nationality by Alice Stopford Green
  4. The full force of this cannot be appreciated except by referring to the former proof that the mass of a Parliament ought to be men of moderate sentiments, or they will elect an immoderate Ministry, and enact violent laws. – The English Constitution by Walter Bagehot
  5. The duties enjoined upon the census board thus established having been performed, it now rests with Congress to enact a law for carrying into effect the provision of the Constitution which requires an actual enumeration of the people of the United States within the ensuing year. – Complete State of the Union Addresses from 1790 to the Present by Various
  6. The Court, moved by this indication of the popular feeling, by the importance of the church schism and its influence throughout the colony, by the conservative attitude of Yale College, and also by having among its delegates large numbers of Old Lights, proceeded to enact yet more stringent measures than those of the preceding session. – The Development of Religious Liberty in Connecticut by M. Louise Greene, Ph. D.
  7. But there is a time in the series of ages for the appearance of all those called by Providence to enact a part. – Irish Race in the Past and the Present by Aug. J. Thebaud
  8. If my earliest success had been scored as a villain of melodrama, it would be believed that I was competent to enact nothing but villains of melodrama; it happened that I made a hit as a comedian, wherefore nobody will credit that I am capable of anything but being comic. – A Chair on The Boulevard by Leonard Merrick
  9. Yet it had a certain resurrecting influence, and as I sat there proceeding dreamily with my meal, one face and another would flash before me, and memory after memory re- enact itself in the theatre of my fancy. – Vanishing Roads and Other Essays by Richard Le Gallienne
  10. Enact it before me! – Bride of the Mistletoe by James Lane Allen
  11. To the chamber must be submitted every project of finance and of legislation which it is proposed to enact into law, and there is still nothing save a certain measure of custom to prevent the introduction of even the most important of non- financial measures first of all in that house. – The Governments of Europe by Frederic Austin Ogg
  12. " I believe," continues the Attorney General, " that this review of the situation will show the imperative necessity of prompt legislation on this subject, and under the Constitution of this State, the Legislature has ample authority to enact the required legislation." – Story of the Session of the California Legislature of 1909 by Franklin Hichborn
  13. She haunts- both my rooms- and the chapel, too- she wears a white dress and has some stephanotis in her hair- and I am somehow compelled to enact a whole scene with her- there before the altar with all the candles blazing- and it seems as if I put a ring upon her hand- like the one you are wearing there- she has lovely hands. – The Man and the Moment by Elinor Glyn
  14. Not only does Congress fail to enact new laws to meet their needs, but it refuses to proceed under the laws that already exist. – The Iron Trail by Rex Beach
  15. I am not one of those who would willingly see this Congress enact a code to be applied to all Territories and for all time to come. – The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government, Vol. 1 (of 2) by Jefferson Davis
  16. Well, those are laws which the majority, being met together in conclave, approve and enact as to what it is right to do, and what it is right to abstain from doing. – The Memorabilia Recollections of Socrates by Xenophon
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