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Usage examples for electromotive

  1. It has already been explained that, in order to charge a condenser of a given capacity at a constant voltage, the electromotive force must be applied for a certain minimum time, which is determined by the value of the capacity and the resistance of the secondary circuit of the induction coil. – Hertzian Wave Wireless Telegraphy by John Ambrose Fleming
  2. There was nothing I could find bearing upon the counter electromotive force of the armature, and the effect of the resistance of the armature on the work given out by the armature. – Edison, His Life and Inventions by Frank Lewis Dyer and Thomas Commerford Martin
  3. By the inductive arrangement it is possible to create in an aerial electromotive forces which are equivalent to a spark of a foot in length, and when the length of the aerial is also properly proportioned the potential along it will increase all the way up, until at the top or insulated end of the aerial it may reach an amount capable of giving sparks several feet in length. – Hertzian Wave Wireless Telegraphy by John Ambrose Fleming
  4. Hence this break increases the current, but not the electromotive force in the secondary coil. – Hertzian Wave Wireless Telegraphy by John Ambrose Fleming
  5. Thermo- electric Pyrometers- When wires of two different metals are joined at one end and heated, an electromotive force will be set up between the free ends of the wires. – Steam, Its Generation and Use by Babcock & Wilcox Co.
  6. They are not good for ordinary purposes because the moment they go to work driving electrons the conditions inside them change so their electromotive force is changed. – Letters of a Radio-Engineer to His Son by John Mills
  7. The speed of the motor can be regulated by a small resistance, and can be adapted to the electromotive force used in the primary circuit. – Hertzian Wave Wireless Telegraphy by John Ambrose Fleming
  8. So, we can accomplish a similar result in passing electricity through an iron wire at the same rate it flows through a silver wire of the same size, by increasing the pressure, or electromotive power; and this is called increasing the voltage. – Electricity and Magnetism Nature's Miracles, Vol. III. by Elisha Gray
  9. And that great reduction in the size and cost of conductors, involved also a great difference in the composition of the electric energy employed in the system; that difference consisting in generating the necessary amount of electrical energy with comparatively high electromotive force, and comparatively low current, instead of contrariwise. – Edison, His Life and Inventions by Frank Lewis Dyer and Thomas Commerford Martin
  10. The unit of electromotive force is the volt, and this is the electric pressure which will force a current of 1 ampere through a resistance of 1 ohm; it is expressed by the symbol E. A fresh dry cell will deliver a current of about 1. 5 volts. – The Radio Amateur's Hand Book by A. Frederick Collins
  11. Here it may be so effective that the form of the curve is completely lost unless a very large electromotive force is used to separate the ions when the ionisation is being investigated. – The Birth-Time of the World and Other Scientific Essays by J. (John) Joly
  12. The volt is the electromotive force which produces a current of 1 ampere when steadily applied to a conductor the resistance of which is 1 ohm. – The Radio Amateur's Hand Book by A. Frederick Collins
  13. The Wehnelt break does not increase the actual secondary electromotive force, nor apparently its duration, but it greatly increases the number of times per second this electromotive force makes it appearance. – Hertzian Wave Wireless Telegraphy by John Ambrose Fleming
  14. It can be accomplished by the application of any high electromotive force. – Hertzian Wave Wireless Telegraphy by John Ambrose Fleming
  15. For example, it is quite demonstrable that during the making of a simple dash of the Morse alphabet by the neutral relay at the home station the distant pole- changer may reverse its battery several times; the home pole- changer may do likewise, and the home transmitter may increase and decrease the electromotive force of the home battery repeatedly. – Edison, His Life and Inventions by Frank Lewis Dyer and Thomas Commerford Martin