Definitions of eclipse

  1. To obscure, darken, or extinguish the beauty, luster, honor, etc., of; to sully; to cloud; to throw into the shade by surpassing.
  2. To cause the obscuration of; to darken or hide; - said of a heavenly body; as, the moon eclipses the sun.
  3. To intercept the light of; darken.
  4. To suffer an eclipse.
  5. To hide a luminous body in whole or in part; to obscure; to darken; to disgrace; to extinguish.
  6. To hide or conceal a luminous body in whole or in part; to cloud or darken; to disgrace.
  7. one celestial body obscures another
  8. An interception or obscuration of the light of the sun, moon, or other luminous body, by the intervention of some other body, either between it and the eye, or between the luminous body and that illuminated by it. A lunar eclipse is caused by the moon passing through the earth's shadow; a solar eclipse, by the moon coming between the sun and the observer. A satellite is eclipsed by entering the shadow of its primary. The obscuration of a planet or star by the moon or a planet, though of the nature of an eclipse, is called an occultation. The eclipse of a small portion of the sun by Mercury or Venus is called a transit of the planet.
  9. The loss, usually temporary or partial, of light, brilliancy, luster, honor, consciousness, etc.; obscuration; gloom; darkness.
  10. The total or partial darkening of the light of the sun, moon, or other heavenly body, caused by its entering the shadow of another body; an overshadowing; temporary failure.
  11. In astron. an interception or obscuration of the light of the sun, moon, or other luminous body, by the intervention of some other body either between it and the eye or between the luminous body and that illuminated by it; thus, an eclipse of the sun is caused by the intervention of the moon, which totally or partially hides the sun's disc; an eclipse of the moon is occasioned by the shadow of the earth, which falls on it and obscures it in whole or in part, but does not entirely conceal it. The number of eclipses of the sun and moon cannot be fewer than two nor more than seven in one year. The most usual number is four, and it is rare to have more than six.
  12. Obscuration of the light of a heavenly body; darkness.
  13. An interception of the light of the sun, moon, or other luminary by the intervention of some opaque body, as of that of the sun by the intervention of the moon, or that of the moon by the shadow of the earth; obscuration; darkness.
  14. The phenomenon of a celestial body disappearing from view in whole or in part, in consequence of another celestial body passing between it and the spectator; darkness.
X