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Usage examples for EARE

  1. When Venus spied her, shee began to laugh, and as angry persons accustome to doe, she shaked her head, and scratched her right eare saying, O goddesse, goddesse, you are now come at length to visit your husband that is in danger of death, by your meanes: bee you assured, I will handle you like a daughter: where be my maidens, Sorrow and Sadnesse? – The Golden Asse by Lucius Apuleius
  2. Yes Madam: but I thinke your Grace Out of the paine you suffer'd, gaue no eare too't Kath. – Henry-VIII by Shakespeare, William
  3. That's worthily As any eare can heare. – Coriolanus by Shakespeare, William
  4. I walked into the ruined garden, and there found a plain little girle, kinswoman of Mr. Falconbridge, to sing very finely by the eare only, but a fine way of singing, and if I come ever to lacke a girle again I shall think of getting her. – Diary of Samuel Pepys, Complete Transcribed From The Shorthand Manuscript In The Pepysian Library Magdalene College Cambridge By The Rev. Mynors Bright by Samuel Pepys Commentator: Lord Braybrooke
  5. No, it is stopt with other flatt'ring sounds As praises of his state: then there are found Lasciuious Meeters, to whose venom sound The open eare of youth doth alwayes listen. – Richard-II by Shakespeare, William
  6. In Maryland offenders were " nayled by both eares to the Pillory, 3 Nailes in each Eare and the Nailes to be slit out." – Stage-coach and Tavern Days by Alice Morse Earle
  7. Peele's " The Love of King David and Fair Bethsabe, with the Tragedie of Absalon," acted about 1591, has, unlike " Arden," many " filed points to make it gratious to the eare and eye." – Tragedy by Ashley H. Thorndike
  8. 131 Of Auricular figures apperteyning to single words and working by their diuers sounds and audible tunes, alteration to the eare onely and not to the minde. – The Arte of English Poesie by George Puttenham
  9. Therefore ought a wise Prince take a third course, making choyce of some understanding men in his State, and give only to them a free liberty of speaking to him the truth; and touching those things only which he inquires of, and nothing else; but he ought to be inquisitive of every thing, and hear their opinions, and then afterwards advise himself after his own manner; and in these deliberations, and with every one of them so carrie himself, that they all know, that the more freely they shall speak, the better they shall be liked of: and besides those, not give eare to any one; and thus pursue the thing resolved on, and thence continue obstinate in the resolution taken. – Machiavelli, Volume I The Art of War; and The Prince by Niccolò Machiavelli
  10. My Lord, I loue you; And durst commend a secret to your eare Much waightier then this worke. – Henry-VIII by Shakespeare, William
  11. Our wildmen weare dazelled att such guifts, because that the porcelaine is very rare and costly in their countrey, and then seeing themselves flattered with faire words, to which they gave eare – Voyages of Peter Esprit Radisson by Peter Esprit Radisson
  12. But I was mightily pleased with his singing; for the rogue hath a very good eare and a good voice. – Diary of Samuel Pepys, Complete Transcribed From The Shorthand Manuscript In The Pepysian Library Magdalene College Cambridge By The Rev. Mynors Bright by Samuel Pepys Commentator: Lord Braybrooke
  13. Fresh Embasses, and Suites, Nor from the State, nor priuate friends heereafter Will I lend eare to. – Coriolanus by Shakespeare, William
  14. He told me in my eare this night what he and his brothers have resolved to give me, which is L200, for helping them out with two or three ships. – Diary of Samuel Pepys, Complete Transcribed From The Shorthand Manuscript In The Pepysian Library Magdalene College Cambridge By The Rev. Mynors Bright by Samuel Pepys Commentator: Lord Braybrooke
  15. While others stand withoute and gaze thereinne- Your eare good folk, for these! – The Window-Gazer by Isabel Ecclestone Mackay
  16. Mine eare is open, and my heart prepar'd: The worst is worldly losse, thou canst vnfold: Say, Is my Kingdome lost? – Richard-II by Shakespeare, William