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Usage examples for eagre

  1. And the mill with its booming- the great chestnut tree under which they played at house- their own little river, the Ripple, where the banks seemed like home, and Tom was always seeing water- rats while Maggie gathered the purple plumy tops of the reeds which she forgot, and dropped afterwards- above all, the great Floss, along which they wandered with a sense of travel, to see the rushing spring- tide, the awful Eagre come up like a hungry monster, or to see the Great Ash which had once wailed and groaned like a man- these things would always be just the same to them. – Hospital Sketches by Robert Swain Peabody
  2. The Floss is a tidal river like the Trent, and in each case the spring- tide, rushing up the river with its terrific wave and flooding the land for miles round, is known as the Eagre a name not a little descriptive of the thing itself. – George Eliot by Mathilde Blind
  3. Wherefore with leave th' infinitie I'll sing Of time, Of Space: or without leave; I'm brent With eagre rage, my heart for joy doth spring, And all my spirits move with pleasant trembeling. – Democritus Platonissans by Henry More
  4. But like an Eagre rode in triumph o'er the tide. – The Ports, Harbours, Watering-places and Picturesque Scenery of Great Britain Vol. 1 by William Finden
  5. Yet loud as when he first showed War's effete Their Schoolman off his eagre mounted high, And summoned to subject who dared compete, The cannon in the name Napoleon Discoursed of sulphur earth to curtained sky. – The Complete Project Gutenberg Works of George Meredith by George Meredith
  6. 164. He remarks, The English term eagre still survives in provincial dialect for the tide- wave or bore on rivers. – Beowulf by Unknown
  7. A large wave like an eagre diverging from its bow, was extending to either bank, swamping the tules and threatening to submerge the lower levees. – A Protegee of Jack Hamlin's and Other Stories by Bret Harte
  8. And the mill with its booming- the great chestnut- tree under which they played at houses- their own little river, the Ripple, where the banks seemed like home, and Tom was always seeing the water- rats, while Maggie gathered the purple plumy tops of the reeds, which she forgot and dropped afterward- above all, the great Floss, along which they wandered with a sense of travel, to see the rushing spring- tide, the awful Eagre come up like a hungry monster, or to see the Great Ash which had once wailed and groaned like a man- these things would always be just the same to them. – The Ontario Readers: The High School Reader, 1886 by Ministry of Education