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Definitions of EAD

  1. In Saxon names, happy, fortunate; as in Edward, happy preserver; Edgar, happy power; Edwin, happy conqueror.
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Usage examples for EAD

  1. If I'd been done like that I should never hold up my 'ead agin. – Project Gutenberg, Deep Waters, by W.W. Jacobs by W.W. Jacobs
  2. And Prince Ead mond's is in the van- guard too. – A Crooked Mile by Oliver Onions
  3. If we don't all get five bob a week more I'll eat my 'ead." – Project Gutenberg, Deep Waters, by W.W. Jacobs by W.W. Jacobs
  4. I marched along in front of 'im with my 'ead in the air, and when he spoke to me I didn't answer him. – Project Gutenberg, Deep Waters, by W.W. Jacobs by W.W. Jacobs
  5. I know this is weak in me, and that his coming back can l ead to no good result for either of us; but he is the only living being left me to love; and- I can't explain it- but I want to put my arms round his neck and tell him about Mary. – The Queen of Hearts by Wilkie Collins Last Updated: January 3, 2009
  6. Sam looked at Peter, but Peter shook 'is 'ead at him. – Light Freights, Complete by W. W. Jacobs
  7. He shook 'is 'ead and looked at them sorrowful and severe at the same time. – Light Freights, Complete by W. W. Jacobs
  8. " We've got the locket, Sam," ses Peter, smiling and shaking his 'ead at 'im. – Project Gutenberg, Deep Waters, by W.W. Jacobs by W.W. Jacobs
  9. I shook my 'ead at 'im. – Project Gutenberg, Deep Waters, by W.W. Jacobs by W.W. Jacobs
  10. Bill just stopped to throw a lump of mould at her, and then went on digging till Henery Walker, who also thought 'e 'ad gone mad, and didn't want to stop 'im too soon, put 'is 'ead over the 'edge and asked 'im the same thing. – Light Freights, Complete by W. W. Jacobs
  11. Either you've been drinking, or else your 'ead's gone a little bit off. – Light Freights, Complete by W. W. Jacobs
  12. " Bill," ses the skipper, shaking his silly 'ead at me. – Project Gutenberg, Deep Waters, by W.W. Jacobs by W.W. Jacobs
  13. The policeman shook his 'ead. – Project Gutenberg, Deep Waters, by W.W. Jacobs by W.W. Jacobs
  14. " No," he ses, shaking his 'ead. – Project Gutenberg, Deep Waters, by W.W. Jacobs by W.W. Jacobs
  15. Then he came to Stirling and asked: " 'Ow much do you think that 'ead of bone will weigh?" – The Ice Pilot by Henry Leverage
  16. The man looked up and down the street, and then he put his 'ead near them and whispered. – Project Gutenberg, Deep Waters, by W.W. Jacobs by W.W. Jacobs