Dictionary.net

Definitions of e'er

  1. at all times; all the time and on every occasion; " I will always be there to help you"; " always arrives on time"; " there is always some pollution in the air"; " ever hoping to strike it rich"; " ever busy"
  2. A contraction for ever. See Ever.
  3. A short form of ever; as, the sweetest song that e'er I heard.
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Antonyms for e'er

ne'er, nevermore, once, never.

Quotes of e'er

  1. Whoever thinks a faultless piece to see, Thinks what ne'er was, nor is, nor e'er shall be. – Alexander Pope
  2. No man e'er felt the halter draw, With good opinion of the law. – John Trumbull

Usage examples for e'er

  1. All men are not born artists, nor will labor E'er make them artists. – The Complete Poetical Works of Henry Wadsworth Longfellow by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow
  2. Then each man let his dog bite at the entrails of a stag, while they repeated old charms and verses over them, such as:- " Diana, no better e'er track'd a wood; There's many a huntsman not half so good." – Sidonia The Sorceress V1 by William Mienhold
  3. He came, with his face of bold wonder, to feel, The hair of my side, and to lift up my heel, And question'd my face with wide eyes; but when under My lids he saw tears,- for I wept at his wonder, He stroked me, and utter'd such kindliness then, That the once love of women, the friendship of men In past sorrow, no kindness e'er came like a kiss On my heart in its desolate day such as this! – The Poetical Works of Thomas Hood by Thomas Hood
  4. For me, I cannot see how native wit Can e'er dispense with art, or art with it. – The Satires, Epistles, and Art of Poetry by Horace a.k.a. Quintus Horatius Flaccus Translated by John Conington, M. A.
  5. " Good reason," quoth the king, " thou come behind, Nor e'er compare thee with the Prince of Ind." – Jerusalem Delivered by Torquato Tasso
  6. In like manner they contract ever a one into " e'er a one;" by which they mean either or any one. – The Grammar of English Grammars by Goold Brown
  7. I ask e'er a gentleman present." – The Complete Project Gutenberg Works of George Meredith by George Meredith
  8. O treasure mine, if lover e'er possessed A treasure! – The Literature of Ecstasy by Albert Mordell
  9. The watchful bird, with crested head, ne'er calls Aurora with his song; no wakeful dog, Nor goose more wakeful, e'er the silence breaks; No savage beasts, no pastur'd flocks, no boughs Shook by the breeze; no brawl of human voice There sounds: but death- like silence reigns around. – The Metamorphoses of Publius Ovidus Naso in English blank verse Vols. I & II by Ovid
  10. Certainly it hadn't been the fairest that e'er the sun shone on! – Every Man for Himself by Hopkins Moorhouse
  11. And time that is e'er pitiful must pass Over it- Before there is forgiveness. – Yolanda of Cyprus by Cale Young Rice
  12. Death seize thee first, Or e'er thou touch me- off! – Suppliant Maidens and Other Plays by AEschylus
  13. Did e'er such love and sorrow meet, Or thorns compose so rich a crown! – The Story of Our Hymns by Ernest Edwin Ryden
  14. But I'm not afraid of e'er a man I faced, de Spain; they'll tell you that when I'm dead. – Nan of Music Mountain by Frank H. Spearman
  15. You know old Trooper Campbell, And have you ever heard That bluff or lead could turn him, That e'er he broke his word? – In the Days When the World Was Wide and Other Verses by Henry Lawson
  16. Remote from towns he ran his godly race, Nor e'er had changed nor wished to change his place. – St. Cuthbert's by Robert E. Knowles
  17. How shall he cut it Without e'er a knife? – Cole's Funny Picture Book No. 1 by Edward William Cole
  18. Nor less beloved were they of him Who gave them birth, Kasyapu proud, But made by nature stern and grim, His love was covered by a cloud From which it rarely e'er emerged, To gladden these sweet human flowers. – Ancient Ballads and Legends of Hindustan by Toru Dutt
  19. Ascend to heaven and bring thy prayer to Jove, If e'er by word or act thou gav'st him aid. – The Story of Troy by Michael Clarke
  20. She bent amid a haughty nation, knowing No sun e'er set upon its widespread towers, Though right and good had deemed that day the lion To sheath its claws and robe itself in flowers. – Fifty-One Years of Victorian Life by Margaret Elizabeth Leigh Child-Villiers, Countess of Jersey