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Usage examples for Diphthongal

  1. With Englishmen it has a diphthongal power. – The English Language by Robert Gordon Latham
  2. All the vowels do not equally well exemplify in their utterance a distinction of sound in their radical and vanishing movements, because some vowel sounds are less diphthongal than others, and some, again, are pure monophthongs; but these two movements and the concrete variation of pitch, the result of one impulse of the voice, are the essential structure of every syllable, and are characteristic of speech- notes as contradistinguished from those of song. – The Ontario Readers: The High School Reader, 1886 by Ministry of Education
  3. In all these we have seen a tendency to diphthongal sounds. – The English Language by Robert Gordon Latham
  4. This is a diphthongal sound, equivalent to the sounds of middle a and open e quickly united. – The Grammar of English Grammars by Goold Brown
  5. Each of the diphthongal letters was doubtless, originally heard in pronouncing the words which contain them. – The Grammar of English Grammars by Goold Brown
  6. The words quoted indicate the nature of the diphthongal system. – The English Language by Robert Gordon Latham
  7. In common conversation we pronounce the i in wind, like the i in bit; in rehearsing, or in declamation, however, we pronounce it like the i in bite; that is, we give it a diphthongal sound. – The English Language by Robert Gordon Latham
  8. Or: " We abound more in vowel and diphthongal sounds, than most nations." – The Grammar of English Grammars by Goold Brown
  9. As to the long sounds of i or y, and of u, these two being diphthongal he supposes the short sound of each to be no other than the short sound of its latter element ee or oo. – The Grammar of English Grammars by Goold Brown
  10. 60. But all the sounds of the vowel u, whether diphthongal or simple, are excluded from his list, unless he means to represent one of them by the e in err; and the complex vowel sound heard in voice and boy, is confessedly omitted on account of a doubt whether it consists of two sounds or of three! – The Grammar of English Grammars by Goold Brown