consonant

[k_ˈɒ_n_s_ə_n_ə_n_t], [kˈɒnsənənt], [kˈɒnsənənt]

Definitions of consonant:

  1.   Consonantly. – The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  2.   CONSONANTAL. – The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  3.   An articulation which can be sounded only with a vowel: a letter representing such a sound. – The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  4.   Accordant; agreeable. – The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  5.   A letter which cannot be sounded without a vowel. – Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  6.   A sound which cannot be easily uttered except when combined with a vowel; a letter representing such a sound. – The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  7.   Harmonious; accordant. – The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  8.   A sound usually given only with a vowel, and represented by a consonant letter. – The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  9.   In accordance; agreeing in sound; consisting of consonants. – Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  10.   Agreeing; according; consistent; suitable. – Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  11.   A letter of the alphabet, as d or g, which cannot be sounded without the aid of a vowel. – Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  12.   Consistent: suitable. – The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.

Quotes for consonant:

  1. We remain at peace with all nations, and no efforts on my part consistent with the preservation of our rights and the honor of the country shall be spared to maintain a position so consonant to our institutions. – Martin Van Buren

Usage examples for consonant:

  1. Had that been consonant with his ideas of justice he would not have made his visit to Hap House this morning. ” – Castle Richmond by Anthony Trollope
  2. When the mouth is closed, as in the production of the consonant m, e. ” – The Brain and the Voice in Speech and Song by F. W. Mott
  3. If it was to be tolerated at all in correct society, it must at least be danced in a deliberate manner, consonant with the dignity of the English character. ” – Routledge's Manual of Etiquette by George Routledge
  4. Had Pitt remained in power, the Peace of Amiens would have been less one- sided, its maintenance more dignified; and the First Consul, who respected the strong but bullied the weak, would probably have acquiesced in a settlement consonant with the reviving prestige of England. ” – William Pitt and the Great War by John Holland Rose
  5. Loyal to both the allies, he managed to steer between their not always consonant aims while preserving his own independence, by taking what seemed, on the whole, the most liberal side in debated questions. ” – Cavour by Countess Evelyn Martinengo-Cesaresco
  6. As the abbey was much more frequent, and as a great part of the riches of the kingdom passed through the hands of the monk, and charity being consonant to the profession of that order, the weight of the poor chiefly lay upon the religious houses; this was the general mark for the indigent, the idle, and the impostor, who carried meanness in their aspect, and the words Christ Jesus in their mouth. ” – An History of Birmingham (1783) by William Hutton
  7. The old account is probably the more reliable, as it is the more consonant with his previous career. ” – An Illustrated History of Ireland from AD 400 to 1800 by Mary Frances Cusack
  8. “ A consideration of the actual state of affairs at the end of January, 1803, will perhaps guide us to an explanation which is more consonant with the grandeur of Napoleon's designs. ” – The Life of Napoleon I (Volumes, 1 and 2) by John Holland Rose
  9. She had shrunk back a little from it, timid before the suspicion that she might like Peter more tempestuously and unreasonably than was consonant with self- mastery. ” – Rose MacLeod by Alice Brown
  10. Use a before all words beginning with a consonant sound, and use an before words beginning with a vowel sound, h mute, or h initial, if the accent is on any other syllable than the first. ” – 1001 Questions and Answers on Orthography and Reading by B. A. Hathaway

Alphabet: