commensurate

[k_ə_m_ˈɛ_n_ʃ_ʊə_ɹ_ˌeɪ_t], [kəmˈɛnʃʊ͡əɹˌe͡ɪt], [kəmˈɛnʃʊ‍əɹˌe‍ɪt]

Definitions of commensurate:

  1.   Equal; proportional; having equal measure or extent. – Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  2.   To reduce to a common measure; to make proportionate. – The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  3.   Commensurateness. – The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  4.   COMMENSURATENESS, COMMENSURATION. – The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  5.   To reduce to a common measure; to proportionate. – Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  6.   Reducible to a common measure; equal; adequate; corresponding in amount; as, our fortunes are often not commensurate with our desires. – The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  7.   Of equal measure or extent; proportionate to. – Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  8.   Commensurable. – The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  9.   Of the same measure with: equal in measure or extent: in proportion with. – The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  10.   Of equal measure; in proportion with. – The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  11.   Commensurately. – The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.

Quotes for commensurate:

  1. Our Fly Smart philosophy is about investing only on those points of differentiation that pay for themselves, that earn a revenue premium commensurate with what it costs us to provide that product or service. – Gerard Arpey
  2. The psyche of the individual is commensurate with the totality of creative energy. This requires a most radical revision of Western psychology. – Stanislav Grof
  3. The fact that our task is exactly commensurate with our life gives it the appearance of being infinite. – Franz Kafka
  4. Moreover, broad plans commensurate with our national purpose and resources would bring conviction of our power to every soldier in the front line, to the nations associated with us in the war, and to the enemy. – Kelly Miller
  5. Today, unless women gain jobs and athletic scholarships commensurate with their percentage of the population, feminists scream discrimination. – Marvin Olasky

Usage examples for commensurate:

  1. As Cousin E. E. says, people do expect something better than alpaca and calico of high genius- especially when the form is tall, and the figure commensurate to the genius. ” – Phemie Frost's Experiences by Ann S. Stephens
  2. From statements of prisoners, it appears that they have been greatly disappointed by the moral effect produced by their heavy guns, which, despite the actual losses inflicted, has not been at all commensurate with the colossal expenditure of ammunition which has really been wasted. ” – America's War for Humanity by Thomas Herbert Russell
  3. These qualities and rules of conduct have characterized the Catholic missionaries in all ages, in all parts of the world, and in their dealings with every variety of the human race; and their success has everywhere been commensurate with the superiority, in a merely temporal point of view, of the system on which they acted. ” – Journal of an African Cruiser by Horatio Bridge
  4. What punishment has been inflicted, and what can be inflicted upon him, in any manner commensurate with the atrocity of his crimes? ” – The Works of the Right Honourable Edmund Burke, Vol. XII. (of XII.) by Edmund Burke
  5. The immense power thus provided is rendered more secure and certain than that of steam, because there exists no doubt whatever that a full supply of water commensurate with the power, can be had at all times and seasons. ” – The Ports, Harbours, Watering-places and Picturesque Scenery of Great Britain Vol. 1 by William Finden
  6. The nations will settle differences in accordance with the law that permits the more powerful to wield control commensurate with their geographical and intellectual importance. ” – Psycho-Phone Messages by Francis Grierson
  7. The decrease of revenue arising from the situation of our commerce, and the extraordinary expenses which have and may become necessary, must be taken into view in making commensurate provisions for the ensuing year; and I recommend to your consideration the propriety of insuring a sufficiency of annual revenue at least to defray the ordinary expenses of Government, and to pay the interest on the public debt, including that on new loans which may be authorized. ” – Complete State of the Union Addresses from 1790 to the Present by Various
  8. The Canadian people are displaying an intellectual activity commensurate with the expansion of their territory and their accumulation of wealth. ” – Canada under British Rule 1760-1900 by John G. Bourinot
  9. In this matter the Syrian religions were especially original; for even if the Alexandrian mysteries offered man just as comforting prospects of immortality as the eschatology of their rivals, they were backward in building up a commensurate theology. ” – The Oriental Religions in Roman Paganism by Franz Cumont
  10. All the way to Boston she had sat gazing out of the window at the blinding whiteness of the fields, incapable of rousing herself to the necessity of thought, to a degree of feeling commensurate with the situation. ” – The Dwelling Place of Light, Complete by Winston Churchill Last Updated: March 5, 2009

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