cogent

[k_ˈəʊ_dʒ_ə_n_t], [kˈə͡ʊd͡ʒənt], [kˈə‍ʊd‍ʒənt]

Antonyms for cogent:

groundless, inconsequent, incoherent, disjointed, unfathomable, unconvincing, dissuasive, ungraspable, impenetrable, unsupported, Foundationless, unwarranted, unintelligible, invalid, nonvalid, irrelevant, weak, disconnected, unreasoning, unconnected, unreasonable, indecisive, unsound, unfounded, shaky, insignificant, illegitimate, inconsequential, nonrational, unpersuasive, irrational, fallacious, unimportant, ineffective, uncompelling, inconclusive, unsubstantiated, illogical, immaterial, incomprehensible, choppy, baseless, feeble.


Definitions of cogent:

  1.   Urgent; pressing on the mind; not easily resisted; convincing. – Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  2.   powerfully persuasive; " a cogent argument"; " a telling presentation"; " a weighty argument" – Wordnet Dictionary DB
  3.   Cogently. – The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  4.   Having great force; convincing; as, a cogent reason. – The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  5.   Compelling belief; forcible; convincing. – The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  6.   having the power to influence or convince; " a cogent analysis of the problem"; " potent arguments" – Wordnet Dictionary DB
  7.   Forcible; convincing. – The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  8.   Driving or pressing on the mind: powerful: convincing. – The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  9.   Having the power to compel conviction or move the will; constraining; conclusive; forcible; powerful; not easily reasisted. – Newage Dictionary DB
  10.   Cogency. – The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  11.   Compelling, in a physical sense; powerful. – Newage Dictionary DB

Quotes for cogent:

  1. The most cogent reason for restricting the interference of government is the great evil of adding unnecessarily to its power. – John Stuart Mill

Usage examples for cogent:

  1. This is Paley's reasoning upon the subject, and it is too natural, too rigid, and too cogent to be escaped from." ” – Modern Atheism under its forms of Pantheism, Materialism, Secularism, Development, and Natural Laws by James Buchanan
  2. But a good deal had been said which, though not perhaps capable of convincing the unprejudiced American or Frenchman, had been regarded as cogent arguments to country- bred Englishmen. ” – Phineas Redux by Anthony Trollope
  3. And considerations equally cogent require a more convenient organization of the subordinate tribunals, which may be accomplished without an objectionable increase of the number or expense of the judges. ” – Complete State of the Union Addresses from 1790 to the Present by Various
  4. It was used to serve a temporary purpose, and as soon as that purpose was served, it was thrown aside, although it had been described as " so natural, so easy, and so plausible, that it invites one to admit it," as " too natural, too rigid, and too cogent to be escaped from." ” – Modern Atheism under its forms of Pantheism, Materialism, Secularism, Development, and Natural Laws by James Buchanan
  5. We have no reason to regret that these measures have been thus far adopted and pursued, and in proportion as we enlarge our view of the portentous and incalculable situation of Europe we shall discover new and cogent motives for the full development of our energies and resources. ” – Complete State of the Union Addresses from 1790 to the Present by Various
  6. There is no cogent empirical reason for supposing that the laws determining the motions of living bodies are exactly the same as those that apply to dead matter. ” –  by
  7. “ I could see that there was some cogent reason for Maroney's marrying Mrs. Irvin. ” – The Expressman and the Detective by Allan Pinkerton
  8. “ For reasons of her own, which she considered sufficiently cogent she had also resigned all expectations of being her aunt's heiress. ” – God's Good Man by Marie Corelli
  9. But he was forced to decide that the motive was not cogent enough, and that to adopt a definite position, involving the suppression of some of his strongest convictions, for the sake of giving one he loved a pleasure, was like exposing the ark to the risks of battle. ” – Beside Still Waters by Arthur Christopher Benson
  10. In every question there are partisans who bring cogent and convincing arguments for the right side; there are also partisans who bring cogent and convincing arguments for the wrong side. ” – Robert Browning by G. K. Chesterton
  11. And we have cogent grounds for holding that neither the Kaiser nor his Ministers want war. ” – England and Germany by Emile Joseph Dillon
  12. If that reason does not strike you as a cogent one, I am sorry, for to me it appears unanswerable." ” – The Memoires of Casanova, Complete The Rare Unabridged London Edition Of 1894, plus An Unpublished Chapter of History, By Arthur Symons by Jacques Casanova de Seingalt
  13. These, then, appear to be the cogent reasons for the adoption of the medium rise in the modelling by Stradivari. ” – Antonio Stradivari by Horace William Petherick
  14. She hoped, however, that now he would contrive to get this part over as quickly as possible, for which, in the morning, she would, she said, show him cogent reasons. ” – The Marquis of Lossie by George MacDonald
  15. The reasons which he elsewhere asserts, and others still more cogent have secured my indulgence for this paper, which otherwise I should have advised him to throw into the fire. ” – A Handbook to the Works of Browning (6th ed.) by Mrs. Sutherland Orr
  16. The most cogent reason that Harvey D. could advance at first was that there were too many Liberty Bonds to be bought. ” – The Wrong Twin by Harry Leon Wilson
  17. “ " That is to say," broke in Ardan, to give what he conceived a sharper point to Barbican's cogent arguments, " such a race of beings as could exist without existing!" ” – All Around the Moon by Jules Verne
  18. The objections are not cogent – The Life and Voyages of Christopher Columbus (Vol. II) by Washington Irving

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