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Usage examples for belie

  1. He was hand in glove with the Germans all the time, his face did not belie him; he looked the ugliest, stealthiest creature, shewing a covert rudeness towards all English- speaking people, that many of us remember now and understand. – A Woman's Experience in the Great War by Louise Mack
  2. But if report did not belie them, they looked not too closely into a man's seamanship; but, if they found a likely fellow, regarded all as fish which came into their net. – Athelstane Ford by Allen Upward
  3. See mouldering stones and metals' rust Belie the vaunt, That man can bless one pile of dust With chime or chant. – The American Union Speaker by John D. Philbrick
  4. If veracity, on this point, is worth any thing, it is a pity that in both books there are so many points which, like the foregoing parenthesis, belie this profession. – The Grammar of English Grammars by Goold Brown
  5. Plainness and uncouthness in humans only too often belie noble mind or disposition. – Feminism and Sex-Extinction by Arabella Kenealy
  6. A little princess had been born to her in the meantime, and her beauty did not belie the Frog's prediction. – Old-Time Stories by Charles Perrault
  7. In both condolence and congratulation men's faces often belie their hearts; thou who knowest thine own sheep, should'st be able to tell kindness from flattery. – Story of Orestes A Condensation of the Trilogy by Richard G. Moulton
  8. Baesine, said Flipke, without wishing to belie you, I must tell you that a message was sent to us in the name of the baes. – Flemish Legends by Charles de Coster
  9. Your face and manners belie you. – Eric, or Little by Little by Frederic W. Farrar
  10. Poor Dick is pining in his rooms at Oxford; and Nan- well, I am afraid her looks belie her; only you know appearances are sometimes deceitful. – Not Like Other Girls by Rosa N. Carey
  11. I am very credulous, but when I see that acts belie words I cease to believe. – Moods by Louisa May Alcott
  12. Even as it is, even putting forth a flattered presentment, I am a little pained; and very glad it is a photograph and not myself that has to go; for in this case, if it please you, you can tell yourself it is my image- and if it displease you, you can lay the blame on the photographer; but in that, there were no help, and the poor author might belie his labours. – The Works of Robert Louis Stevenson - Swanston Edition Vol. 24 (of 25) by Robert Louis Stevenson Other: Andrew Lang
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