Alphabet:
Loading...

Usage examples for axletree

  1. Two or three cabs waited at the curb, from one of which fluttered a facetious knot of white ribbon tied to an axletree – The Henchman by Mark Lee Luther
  2. Yen translated rapidly, scurrying along behind his sentences like a carriage dog beneath an axletree – Mortmain by Arthur Cheny Train
  3. The body is then gone carefully over with a soft mop, using plenty of clean water, and penetrating into every corner of the carved work, so that not an atom of dirt remains; the body of the carriage is then raised by placing the jack under the axletree and raising it so that the wheel turns freely; this is now thoroughly washed with the mop until the dirt is removed, using a water- brush for corners where the mop does not penetrate. ” – The Book of Household Management by Mrs. Isabella Beeton
  4. It also has long shafts which extend under the axletree to make a support for the luggage and a seat for the driver. ” – Norwegian Life by Ethlyn T. Clough
  5. 7. And, though the shady gloom Had given day her room, The Sun himself withheld his wonted speed; And hid his head for shame, As his inferior flame The new- enlighten'd world no more should need; He saw a greater Sun appear Than his bright throne or burning axletree could bear. ” – The Ontario Readers: The High School Reader, 1886 by Ministry of Education
  6. And the whole axletree beneath was polluted with gore, and the rings which were round the chariot seat, which the drops from the horses' hoofs spattered, as well as from the felloes. ” – The Iliad of Homer (1873) by Homer
  7. After waiting an hour and a half, we sent the axletree and wheels back to be repaired; and, leaving the body of the chaise under a guard, procured another to carry us to the next town. ” – Fletcher of Madeley by Frederic W. Macdonald
  8. At last it cleared away entire, But all that we could see Was Lige's dog a squattin' down Beneath the axletree – The Orpheus C. Kerr Papers. Series 3 by Robert H. Newell
  9. But neither Keats nor Shelley, who both had their affinities to Milton, had it in him to reach the concentrated Miltonic energy of such lines as- " The wakeful trump of doom must thunder through the deep," or- " Than his bright throne or burning axletree could bear." ” – Milton by John Bailey
  10. Nine miles from Abbeville our axletree gave way through the hard frost, and we were left to the piercing cold on the side of a hill without shelter. ” – Fletcher of Madeley by Frederic W. Macdonald
  11. “ I could frown To see the day, the day that flings his light Upon my Kingdoms, and contemns old Night; Let him go on and flame, I hope to see Another wild- fire in his Axletree And all false drencht; but I forgot, speak Queen. ” – The Maids Tragedy by Francis Beaumont and John Fletcher
  12. “ I fell towards the door, which, bursting open, launched me out upon the road, at the same moment that the broken axletree of the caleche had upset it on the opposite side, carrying one horse along with it, and leaving the other with the postillion on his back, kicking and plunging with all his might. ” – The Confessions of Harry Lorrequer, Complete by Charles James Lever (1806-1872)
  13. 12. Locke, after a moment's reflection, and a glance round the room for something to serve for apparatus, took from a shelf, where he had espied a number of articles, the smallest of a set of cast- iron cart boxes, as are usually termed the round hollow tubes in which the axletree of a carriage turns. ” – McGuffey's Fifth Eclectic Reader by William Holmes McGuffey
  14. There was no body to them, but only two long poles going from the forward axletree to the back axletree and the load was packed on these poles, and covered with canvas. ” – Rollo in Geneva by Jacob Abbott
  15. “ A part of it strikes De Young's dumpcart abaft the axletree and flings him, hurtling, skyward, a thing of legs and arms, to descend on the distant mountains, where it is cold. ” – Black Beetles in Amber by Ambrose Bierce
  16. It was a very good iron axletree wagon, made in Dearbornville by William Halpin. ” – The Bark Covered House or, Back in the Woods Again by William Nowlin