aggregate

[ˈa_ɡ_ɹ_ɪ_ɡ_ˌeɪ_t], [ˈaɡɹɪɡˌe͡ɪt], [ˈaɡɹɪɡˌe‍ɪt]

Definitions of aggregate:

  1.   Aggregation. – The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  2.   To collect into one sum, mass, or body; to accumulate. – Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  3.   To gather together, or into a mass. – The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  4.   To collect into a mass: to accumulate. – The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  5.   Formed of parts collected. – The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  6.   To collect or bring together; to amount to; as, his debts aggregated fifty dollars. – The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  7.   The sum total. – The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  8.   AGGREGATELY. – The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  9.   To collect particulars into a sum or mass. – Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  10.   Formed in a cluster. – A dictionary of scientific terms. By Henderson, I. F.; Henderson, W. D. Published 1920.
  11.   The sum total; the result of many particulars. – Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  12.   Formed into a mass or total; as, the aggregate amount. – The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  13.   A sum or total. – The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  14.   Formed by a collection of many particulars. – Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  15.   Total; as, the aggregate of his debts; the entire number; mass. – The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  16.   Formed of parts taken together. – The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  17.   The sum or assemblage of particulars; a whole formed by the union of homogeneous particles. – Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  18.   Formed by a collection of particulars into a whole mass; composed of several florets united at the base by the receptacle. Of a corporation, consisting of two or more persons, and perpetuated by a succession of new members. Of glands, clustered together. Consisting of different rocks mechanically separable. – Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.

Quotes for aggregate:

  1. It is therefore utterly false to say that Marx revokes the law of value as far as individual commodities are concerned, and maintains it in force solely for the aggregate of these commodities. – Rudolf Hiferding
  2. As the Church is the aggregate of believers, there is an intimate analogy between the experience of the individual believer, and of the Church as a whole. – Charles Hodge
  3. From this time on, the universe is built up into an aggregate of permanent objects connected by causal relations that are independent of the subject and are placed in objective space and time. – Jean Piaget
  4. With the people, especially a people seized of property, resides the aggregate of original power. – Ezra Stiles
  5. Science means simply the aggregate of all the recipes that are always successful. All the rest is literature. – Paul Valery

Usage examples for aggregate:

  1. The writer of this with a family to support, did not possess in the year 1841 in the aggregate a sum of money equal to five dollars. ” – The History of Peru by Henry S. Beebe
  2. “ I regret to say that the aggregate would have bought up three small police organizations, body and soul. ” – The Complete PG Edition of The Works of Winston Churchill by Winston Churchill
  3. In like manner the estimate of appropriations for the Navy Department will present an aggregate sum of upward of $ 3, 000, 000. About half of these, however, covers the current expenditures of the Navy in actual service, and half constitutes a fund of national property, the pledge of our future glory and defense. ” – Complete State of the Union Addresses from 1790 to the Present by Various
  4. The Canadian uses more brains and his aggregate returns are bigger; but boned down to a basis of who can save the most and become rich fastest, your foreigner has the native- born Canadian beaten at the start. ” – The Canadian Commonwealth by Agnes C. Laut
  5. “ A general truth is but an aggregate of particular truths. ” – Logic, Inductive and Deductive by William Minto
  6. The aggregate cost was three millions of dollars. ” – Due North or Glimpses of Scandinavia and Russia by Maturin M. Ballou
  7. The prosperity of a colony is the aggregate of individual wealth. ” – The Bushman Life in a New Country by Edward Wilson Landor
  8. The aggregate tonnage of vessels entering and clearing is double that of Gibraltar. ” – The Story of Malta by Maturin M. Ballou
  9. “ Geologists have often gone wrong in applying to a new district certain principles determined elsewhere, without sufficient consideration of the complexity and relative importance of the sundry geologic factors which in the aggregate determine the local habit of oil occurrence. ” – The Economic Aspect of Geology by C. K. Leith
  10. Every class is, in its eyes, only an aggregate of individuals, and to exalt one class above another is to appreciate some individuals at the expense of others, to place marks of comparative social worth upon the members of different groups which do not correspond to the relative values of their natural qualities. ” – A Short History of English Liberalism by Walter Lyon Blease

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